Column: Trippy

Whenever there is a discussion on the use of psychedelic drugs, such as acid or psilocybin (mushrooms), for medical rather than recreational uses, two polarized opinions tend to appear. One group will always emphasize the dangers of these drugs: They may tell stories about people who had bad trips, or were arrested for acting oddly or violently in public. The other group will then comment on how research shows that these drugs have many medical benefits and few negative side effects. The first group may think that the second are drugged-out hippies or drug addicts trying to justify their habit. The second group may think that the first are parroting DARE propaganda without researching the true science of these compounds. The truth? As unsatisfying as it is, it’s hard to say. There are interesting clues as well as contradictions. Recent research from London conducted functional MRIs on volunteers after they received an injection of psilocybin, the functional compound in “magic mushrooms,” and found that there were decreases in the activity... ...

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Davis Farmers Market Cookbook will be released this Saturday

The Davis Farmers Market will celebrate the debut of The Davis Farmers Market Cookbook this Saturday. This event coincides with the official release of the book. This will be the first of several Market Cookbook Day events to headline the cookbook. Co-authors Georgeanne Brennan and Ann Evans will be there to sign cookbooks. Customers with cookbook gift cards purchased from the Market can redeem them at the Market Shed. The UC Davis Dining Commons will offer “tastes of cookbook recipes” at each Cookbook Day. In the book, Winters resident Brennan and former Davis Mayor and food activist Evans praise the Davis Farmers Market and the local food showcased there every week. The book details eight recipes to adapt to any season, followed by four chapters with each chapter containing about 20 recipes. Alice Waters, Chez Panisse founder and food activist, wrote the book’s foreword. Davis Farmers Market Manager Randii MacNear said the Market plans to use the cookbook as a platform for events throughout 2012. “When the cookbook goes on... ...

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Women’s Tennis preview

Teams: UC Davis vs. Cal State Northridge Records: Aggies 6-10 (2-2), Matadors 9-6 (2-3) Where: Marya Welch Tennis Center, Davis When: Wednesday at 2 p.m. Who to Watch: Coach Bill Maze has cited singles play as the strength of the Aggies’ women’s tennis team, and sophomore Kelly Chui has been a stronghold in the third singles slot. Chui has grabbed wins in six of her last seven matches and also is part of UC Davis’s No. 1 doubles pairing. Did you know? The doubles point is turning out to be a tipping point for UC Davis. The Aggies have won the doubles point only four times this year, and they have emerged victorious each of those times. Yet, the Aggies have lost four matches by scores of 4-3, and in all of those, they won half of the six singles matches but dropped the doubles point. “We could have won a couple extra matches if we’d won the doubles point,” Maze said. “I think we’ll get it together before the... ...

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Aggies respond at home

After an impressive home stand against conference opponent UC Riverside, the 12-22 Aggies proved that they are a real threat in the Big West Conference. UC Davis won the bookends of the three-game series against the now 18-17 Highlanders who came into Davis with a five-game win streak. Freshman pitcher Justine Vela was fantastic over the weekend with 20 strikeouts and only two earned runs allowed in the Aggies’ two wins. Although UC Davis was shutout in the second game, the Aggies furiously responded in the rubber match, winning 9-1 in the shortened five-inning game. The experience from junior Megan Guzman and seniors Kelly Harman and Rachel Miller proved vital as they combined to tally 13 of the team’s 18 hits in the series. The series win gave UC Davis a 2-1 Big West Conference record to start the league campaign. Sunday — UC Davis 3, UC Riverside 1 Vela dominated from the start with four straight strikeouts and would not allow a Highlander hit until the sixth inning in... ...

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The nose knows

UC Davis researchers have found a method for using an electronic nose to detect if fruit has fully ripened, which in the future could reduce costs for farmers harvesting crops, as well as give researchers a more objective tool for measuring fruit flavor and maturity. The electronic nose, called zNose, uses a technique called gas chromatography to separate and identify the chemical compounds that cause aroma in a blended fruit by vaporizing the compounds. Each compound vaporizes at a different time, which allows the user to detect which compounds are present in the juice. “We use aroma compounds produced by fruits during the ripening process as markers to distinguish between fruits harvested at different maturity stages.” said Simona Vallone, a postdoctoral researcher in the department of plant sciences at UC Davis. The researchers tested the zNose’s ability to detect the ripeness of melons in a laboratory setting as well as in the field. They found that the technique was able to differentiate between the different stages of maturity. “The mixture of... ...

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Symposium to be held in observance of National Public Health Week

Aside from being the start of Spring Quarter, this week is also National Public Health Week. The UC Davis Department of Public Health Sciences is observing National Public Health Week by sponsoring a symposium on campus this Thursday. Keynote speaker Ron Chapman, Director and State Health Officer for the California Department of Public Health, will be discussing health equity in California. “We hope this event will bring awareness to public health and teach our guests about the different avenues of public health,” said Crystal Saetern, student affairs officer for the UC Davis Master of Public Health Program. Student Affairs Officer Amber Carrere agreed. “A lot of students don’t know what’s happening in public health,” Carrere said. “It’s a good time to showcase what’s going on, not only in the state, but locally as well.” Organized since April 1995 by the American Public Health Association, the week-long awareness event aims to highlight issues and bring recognition to contributions to public health. According to Saetern, Chapman will discuss causes of statewide health... ...

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Public library closed Sunday and Monday

State and local funding shortfalls will cause the closure of the Yolo County Library branches, which will be closed April 8 to 9. These days will be staff furlough days for the Davis, Winters, West Sacramento, Clarksburg, Esparto and Knights Landing branches. “Yolo County Library’s online services will remain available during these closures,” Yolo County Librarian Patty Wong said in a press release. “Meanwhile, no items will be due or accrue fees for these two days.” The parking lot for the Mary L. Stephens Branch Library in Davis will be inaccessible April 7 to 10 for resealing and restriping work. The library will still be open on April 7 and April 10. — Angela Swartz ...

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Davis Bee Sanctuary celebrates grand opening

For some, the thought of a bee sting conjures up the fear of anaphylactic shock, and potentially, fatality. Others consider bees to be an extreme annoyance and try to avoid them if possible. But a group of local bee enthusiasts known as the Davis Bee Collective views bees as pertinent members of the ecosystem as well as gentle, cooperative creatures. In order to educate the public and create a safe space for bees, the Collective held a grand opening of the Davis Bee Sanctuary on Sunday afternoon. Located behind the Domes on Orchard Park Drive, the Bee Sanctuary’s apiary, or bee yard, serves as a place for bees to swarm and nurture their young. Additionally, the sanctuary is an educational garden where people can learn about keeping bees and harvesting honey without using chemicals. The grand opening was attended by a diverse crowd of interested bee supporters, including small children, students and experienced beekeepers. Free samples of honey were distributed, and several workshops were given on beekeeping tactics. The Bee... ...

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Campus Chic

Eunyoung Lee, third-year psychology and art history major The Aggie: What are you wearing? Lee: This is a thrifted silk blouse and an American Apparel corduroy skirt. My brown oxfords are from Forever 21 and my rings are thrifted and from H&M. How did you decide what to wear today? I bought this skirt two weeks ago and I haven’t worn it yet. It’s the first day of Spring quarter and I wanted to look cute! Where do you find inspiration? I like to go through Lookbook.nu and watching YouTube videos on style. My style changes depending on my mood. Some days it’s girly and feminine and other days it’s punk rock with dark makeup and all black. What are you looking forward to wearing for warmer weather? I bought this floral corset that I’m excited to wear with my riding pants from American Apparel. STEPHANIE B. NGUYEN can be reached at campus@theaggie.org. ...

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Column: Care about health care

From March 26 to March 28, the Supreme Court of the United States heard the first arguments for and against President Obama’s health care law. The Affordable Care Act was passed by Congress two years ago, drawing up a storm of controversy from the time of its initial inception to the casting of the final vote. At the center of the controversy is the debate of whether the government, under Obama’s leadership, overstepped its constitutionally granted authority by forcing Americans to get health care coverage. Should the bill have even been on the House and Senate floors for votes in the first place? Other concerns include how much the overhaul would cost, and who would pay for it. The right claims that Obama is slowly turning the United States into the s-word. And there is nothing more heinous and despicable on this planet than socialism, of course. You see, the United States is a very individualistic country. Individualism is embedded in its history and has influenced its evolution over the... ...

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News-in-Brief: UC Davis East Quad Farmers Market today

Today is the first day of the UC Davis East Quad Farmers Market at the Silo. The on-campus farmers market, which used to be on the Quad, is a place where students and faculty can buy fresh produce. The market is co-sponsored by UC Davis Stores (formerly UC Davis Bookstores), Campus Recreation and Unions, Student Health and Counseling Services, Students for Sustainable Agriculture, UC Davis Dining Services, the Davis Farmers Market and the Davis Food Co-op. “It’s going to be a festive atmosphere, more fun than walking a produce aisle,” said Jason Lorgan, associate director of the UC Davis Stores, in a press release. Opening day festivities will include music, face painting and button making. The market will take place every Wednesday through June 6, from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. — Hannah Strumwasser ...

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Confusing your muscles?

When it comes to fitness, there are a lot of myths out there to talk about. Because people’s bodies can be so different, and because there are many different regimens specially made for different people, wading through all the claims can be very difficult. One movement is known as “confusing your muscles.” The claim is that doing all of your exercises in the same way leads to your muscles adapting to the regimen, making the exercise less effective. Therefore, you should vary your technique in order to confuse your muscles and prevent them from adapting to the exercise, making your workouts more effective. Supposedly. Unfortunately, this is another movement with an interesting idea that doesn’t really pan out. Yes, your muscles do adapt to exercise, so you should increase your routine as you become stronger and introduce a variety of exercises to strengthen different muscles. However, this adaptation is slow and for the most part happens as your muscles heal after a routine, not during the routine itself. There are... ...

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Column: March sadness

It has been a sad week, as the first week of April is wont to be. Many of us lost something close to our hearts and even closer to our mouths. No, it was not through a prank gone wrong, but rarely have I felt so foolish. I’m speaking, ladies and gentlemen, of the epidemic felt on faces across the country: mustache removal. Everyone goes through the five stages of grief in their own way. I cannot help all of us through each individual step. But the path to acceptance is often paved with shared stories and the best thing we can do for one another is offer our support. I would like to start laying my path with you today, and I hope you will help me on my journey. I remember the day I started growing my mouth eyebrow like it was only a month ago. I was just a boy then, fresh faced and eager, but still I knew that day held weight. A great man once... ...

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