Softball Preview

Teams: UC Davis at Cal State Northridge Records: Aggies, 12-22 (2-1); Matadors 7-24 (2-1) Where: Matador Diamond — Northridge, Calif. When: Friday at noon and 2:00 p.m.; Saturday at noon Who to watch: Cassandra Ginnis has needed little time to adjust to the college game. The freshman sensation ranks second on the team with 25 hits on the season, and is also tied for the team lead in runs scored with 11. The Santa Ana, Calif. native hopes to continue her success near her hometown when the Aggies travel down to Southern California to play Cal State Northridge in their second Big West Conference series of the year. “It is a really good feeling to start freshman year on the field,” Ginnis said. “Especially during conference [play].” Did you know? In the Big West Conference, Pacific is the only team to maintain a winning record after finishing pre-conference play. With the conference title up for grabs, UC Davis will certainly hope to continue the momentum from its two conference victories against UC Riverside. To do this,... ...

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Letter to the editor: Anti-Semitic comments on Facebook

In a Feb. 28, 2012 discussion on the official Facebook page of the UC Davis chapter of the Students for Justice in Palestine (SJP), members directed anti-Semitic slurs at me. One member referred to me as “shitstein.” Clearly the use of “stein,” since it has nothing to do with my name, is a direct reference to Jews.  This epithet, which was “liked” by several members, followed an exchange where members discussed efforts to identify me and then ridiculed my name. One member commented, “his last name is Siegel. WHO WOULDA THOUGHT.” To which someone responded, “what kinda last names did you think i (sic) was looking for lol.” Another went on to comment that “they,” in apparent reference to Jews, “all look WAY too similar.” One person referred to me as an enemy, “spewing his crap.” I consider this threatening behavior. Since SJP members appeared to have a number of questions about my identity and academic rank, on March 20, I sent an e-mail offering to meet with SJP. So... ...

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Column: Foreign freak-out

When I landed in Sacramento Airport seven months ago at the beginning of my exchange year at UC Davis, I was all confused. I didn’t lose my luggage on the trip halfway across the world, I wasn’t interrogated when entering the U.S., my flights weren’t delayed and I even managed to let my parents know about my safe arrival (although I had to borrow a phone from a very nice Canadian person as mine didn’t work). I was confused because I wasn’t freaking out. Not enough, that is. If you are friends on Facebook with a foreign exchange student, the endless location updates from different places in California and the constant stream of pictures from house parties, football games and picnics on the Quad might make you think that we do nothing else but travel, party and sunbathe. Obviously, this is only the tip of the iceberg as there is so much more to studying abroad: It’s about meeting new people, being immersed in a different culture and experiencing a... ...

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Column: Hunger Games

Okay, so can we all acknowledge the pure beauty of the Hunger Games music? Yes, I know all of you have probably willingly dragged yourselves to your local theatre to witness the “movie of the year” (don’t they call every action-packed popular book-turned movie that?), so you should be able to follow along quite nicely with my spiel. With any high-profiting movie these days, Hollywood knows to put out multiple records. Hire a well-known and talented composer for the movie and build up the hype by adding a whole other list of songs written by famous chart-topping artists. Hey, it’s a formula that works both for me and for the record companies. Let us delve first into the movie score itself. Composed by James Newton Howard. I have to confess my love for his work — I mean, my GOD. His beautiful creations for Peter Pan, The Dark Knight, I Am Legend and Blood Diamond already give him the credentials to last a lifetime. I’m not going to lie and... ...

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Column: Real world hunger games

The blockbuster film The Hunger Games, based on the novel by Suzanne Collins, depicts a post-apocalyptic country in which 24 teenagers are chosen by lottery each year and forced to participate in nationally televised blood sports. Everyone must submit their name to the drawing once, but the most destitute can put their name in multiple times in exchange for additional food. As a result, in Panem, the poorest citizens are also those most likely to fight and die in gladiatorial combat. Despite all its science fiction trappings, I would argue that The Hunger Games is not a cautionary tale: it’s an allegory. We already live in a world in which the risk of injury and premature death is distributed unequally. As Ulrich Beck has demonstrated, our probability of suffering misfortune is closely tied to our socioeconomic positions. While no one is totally safe, the most affluent are able to rely on risk management strategies like health insurance or preventative care while the working class and the poor have become increasingly... ...

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Editorial: Potential for flaw

The University of California’s plan to ask students their sexual orientations on their Student Intent to Register (SIR) forms is still in the works. The intention of the proposal is to collect data on the number of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) students at UC and to inform campus climate assessments. Having this information is projected to allow the University to provide students with resources to make them more comfortable on campus. Unfortunately, the main issue with this proposal is that since the survey is optional, there probably would not be accurate data. With potential inaccuracy, these statistics may not be entirely helpful in providing resources if not all students participated. Unlike demographic studies asking about what ethnicity one most identifies with, sexual orientation is less concrete and is much more complexly defined. The question remains: How many options would be on the survey? Is it open to adjustment for students at later times? If the school proceeds with the measure, it should offer more than just heterosexual and... ...

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Technocultural Studies professor documents America

History and context are important to Jesse Drew. The director of technocultural studies here at UC Davis currently has a gallery of photos at SF Camerawork. The photos are part of a series titled Winter in America, named after the Gil Scott-Heron album and song. At the age of 17, Drew moved throughout the United States starting in the winter of 1974 and on into 1975, making his way from protest to protest, taking photos of active participants during these demonstrations. He made his way from the East Coast to the Midwest, finally moving to California. During this time, a young Drew witnessed the aftermath and response to the Attica Prison Riots while in Buffalo, NY. He was among thousands of working-class protesters angry over unemployment in Washington, D.C. In South Boston, he saw both anti-racism and racist demonstrators fighting over the last major segregated school district. He took photos of César Chávez talking to Latino farmworkers. Drew describes 1974 through 1975 as “a time of great crisis in the... ...

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Arts Week

MUSIC Ok Vancouver Ok, Hawk Jones & Magic Bullets Saturday, April 7 at 8 p.m. and Sunday, April 8 at 11 p.m., free Robot Rocket Rez, 633 M St. These three groups are set to perform music that encompasses blues, folk, punk and rock music. Donations are encouraged and all ages are welcome. DANCE Jess Meets Angus Tonight and tomorrow, 8 p.m., free Wright Hall, Lab A Part of the Just Between Us — The Generation Project, this show encompasses the work of UC Davis Ph.D. candidate Jess Curtis and Scottish performer Angus Balbernie. The show focuses on being men “of a certain age” through theatrical dance and dialogue. THEATRE/MONDAVI Davis Shakespeare Ensemble Presents: Relapse Today and Saturday, April 7, 12 and 14 at 8 p.m.; Sunday, April 8 and 15 at 7 p.m. John Natsoulas Gallery, 521 First St. Friday, April 13 at 8 p.m. Rominger West Winery, 4602 Second St. $15/$12/$10 In a retelling of the Orpheus myth with Shakespeare’s Sonnets, Relapse emerges as a devised work by... ...

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Column: TV on the internet

Should we watch another? I find myself asking this question often. Like many, I watch TV shows online. It seems obvious. All the shows I always felt out of the loop of are at my wireless fingertips, for either free or semi-free access. This may very well be the definition of the “on-demand” generation. But while I love not having to wait a week to see Stringer Bell’s next move or if Carrie B. will actually dump Big, I often wonder whether watching these shows in marathon form is taking away from the meaning. That is, do we as an audience need that week to mull over and fully understand last episode’s events? How important is distance when it comes to television? In regular conversation I and many others talk about these high-end HBO, SHOWTIME, AMC, etc. dramas with language that was previously saved for books. This is a result of higher-quality television, a smarter audience base and the internet’s propensity to analyze, overanalyze and .giffify. Even in premium escapist... ...

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What’s on the horizon

The Davis Feminist Film Festival is returning to town next week in what will mark its seventh annual showing. Not to be confused with the UC Davis Film Festival – also on the horizon – the Feminist Film Festival fashions itself as a venue with thematic purpose. That is, if the name didn’t key you in already, the Feminist Film Fest operates with a design for social justice. As explained by 2012 festival director Andrew Ventimiglia, the festival works to provide a space to show the films of underrepresented artists (particularly women and people of color) addressing important issues of gender, race, class, sexuality and other dimensions of social inequality. On Thursday of next week, there will be a preview screening of UC Davis Professor Julie Wyman’s “STRONG!” which chronicles the quest of Olympic athlete Cheryl Haworth to be the strongest woman in the world. Accompanying it will be a slew of short films from all over, all presumably under the umbrella of the festival’s thematic orientation. “I think this... ...

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Track and Field Preview

Events: San Francisco Distance Carnival and the Stanford Invitational Where: San Francisco, Calif.; Stanford, Calif. When: Saturday and Sunday, all day Who to watch: Sophomore Alycia Cridebring set a career best in the 5,000-meter at the Sacramento State Invitational. The Pleasant Hill, Calif. native also finished eighth in the Big West Conference Cross Country Championship meet in October as a part of UC Davis’ league-title winning women’s cross country team. Did you know? With their most recent meet, the Fresno State Invitational, canceled due to weather, the Aggies haven’t been in competition for almost three weeks. “Last week’s cancellation was unfortunate because we had a bye week before due to finals week,” said coach Drew Wartenburg. “But on the positive side, it gets people healthy and more time for training.” Preview: All season Wartenburg has been talking about the importance of early track meets to prepare for the important ones later. Now April has arrived, and the UCD track team is set to partake in the San Francisco State Distance Carnival and the Stanford Invitational this weekend.... ...

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News-in-brief: Santa Monica City College students pepper sprayed while protesting tuition increases

At a Board of Trustees meeting at Santa Monica City College Tuesday night, 30 student protesters were pepper sprayed after attempting to storm the boardroom during the meeting. Two people were transported to the hospital for evaluation. A 4-year-old was also pepper sprayed. A group of about 70 students was protesting the $180-per-unit increase that would add sections to classes that are in high demand. The measure, called Contract Ed, would be the first fee plan of its type in California. Before doors opened, some students were given numbers that would allow entry to the boardroom. Santa Monica City College president Chui L. Tsang issued a statement yesterday that said the use of pepper spray was to “preserve public and personal safety.” The program, Tsang said, would result in an increase of 25 percent more classes than last summer. “The intent of the program is to immediately increase the number of total classroom seats available and provide a way for students to make progress towards their goal,” he said. The... ...

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“Just Between Us — The Generation Project” presents Jess Meets Angus

Jess Meets Angus is the eclectic performance piece anchored by dancer Jess Curtis and actor Angus Balbernie. The show, part of a greater project called “Just Between Us — The Generation Project,” examines the progression of dance through the perspective of different age groups. Jess Curtis is both pragmatic and precise in his movements; the actions show the blossoming of youth and the transition into age. Opposite of Curtis is Angus Balbernie, whose background in acting serves to scale Curtis’ dancing. The combination of acting, dancing, movement and dialogue adds to the theme of generation in the performance. Obtaining his dancing shoes at a dance competition with his girlfriend eventually led Curtis to become the dancer he is today. Through a casual mixing of Saturday night dance fever and an occasional dance class, Curtis’ curiosity now has him preparing to perform at UC Davis. “Movement of our bodies is the very nature of human interaction and that has become an important fixture in shaping my overall guiding philosophy regarding dance,”... ...

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Suspect arrested for residential burglaries in Davis

On March 29, Davis police arrested 37-year-old Kyle Frank of Placerville, Calif. for a residential burglary on Layton Drive. The police responded to a call from one of the residents, a 12-year-old boy, who was home when the robber broke into the house. He heard someone knocking on the door but didn’t answer. Minutes later, he noticed a suspicious person in the backyard and immediately called 911 from inside a locked bathroom. The suspect managed to break into the house through the side door leading into the garage. He was arrested in Slide Hill Park and the two responding police officers found items from the victim’s residence in Frank’s possession. According to the Press Release by the Davis Police Department, there is evidence that connects Frank with another burglary earlier that day on Albany Avenue in South Davis. He was found in possession of items from this residence during the arrest as well. “There were three [burglaries] that day. One at Layton Drive, which is the one that lead to... ...

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Groundskeepers clean up Quad

Yesterday afternoon UC Davis groundskeepers were seen cleaning up remaining tents and objects left by the Occupiers on the Quad. The groundskeepers will also be rehabilitating the grass on which the tents were pitched. ...

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