View country-restricted content on the internet

If you watch a lot of television via the internet, chances are high you have come across a website or video that restricts content to the United States and other countries. Software program TunnelBear recognizes this issue and provides a free and easy way to access internet content globally. Why should I use TunnelBear? TunnelBear is simple and fast. Just go to the website TunnelBear.com, download the program, input the country whose material you wish to view and enjoy! TunnelBear works great for students studying abroad, professionals on global business trips or vacationers on extended holiday. Is it safe? TunnelBear is a secure program that works using encrypted connections. This means that TunnelBear connects your computer to a server in the country whose material you wish to view. It protects your privacy by simply simulating the internet experience in that country. But I use a lot of data. Will TunnelBear still work for me? TunnelBear provides three options. There is a free “Little” plan that allows 500MB of data per... ...

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ICC’s Countdown to Summer!

Welcome to week four of the ICC’s Countdown to Summer!  Each week the Internship and Career Center (ICC) will highlight a task that will help you be prepared to land a job or internship by summer. This week we discuss interviewing. Interviewing An interview often seems daunting, but it signifies that you are one step closer to landing the job and gives you the opportunity to promote yourself.  It is also a test. Employers are feeling you out to see if you would be a good fit.  There are things you can and should do to prepare. Visit iccweb.ucdavis.edu/webshops/index.htm for a quick tutorial. Research the company and position description.  When you confirm the interview, ask what the format will be to avoid being shocked when you sit down across from nine employers. Researching the organization will help you anticipate the kinds of questions you’ll be asked. For instance, if the company emphasizes the importance of leadership and teamwork, then there is a good chance you will be asked about a time... ...

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Column: The end?

Are you familiar with the phrase “happily ever after”? It’s often used to conclude children’s classic stories, particularly the romantic kind featuring prince charmings and princesses. Do you know which two-word phrase comes right after it? It’s the phrase “The End,” which signals to the reader that the story is over. There’s nothing left to question, to analyze or to anticipate. It’s the end of the story, and the end of the world you were temporarily immersed in. Unlike the fairy tales many of us grew up on, there are no neat conclusions in real life. There are no endings, because everything builds on everything else. Real life is a lot more complicated and twisted and messy. The conclusions are either unsatisfactory or nonexistent. Take, for example, the story of Trayvon Martin, the 17-year-old boy who was shot by George Zimmerman in his Florida neighborhood on his way home. Martin was young, unarmed and carrying a bag of skittles and an Arizona Iced Tea. He was also a black male,... ...

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Campus Chic

Ethan Anderes, assistant professor of statistics The Aggie: What are you wearing? Anderes: “Faded Levi’s, Urban Outfitters button-up, Banana Republic sweater and Calvin Klein boots.” How did you decide what to wear today? “A balance between what’s clean and the weather.” Where do you find inspiration? “I enjoy looking at some fashion blogs — The Sartorialist, in particular.” What’s your favorite item in your closet? “My faded Levi’s.” STEPHANIE B. NGUYEN can be reached at campus@theaggie.org. ...

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Nuclear physicist and art critic son to discuss issues in creative process

Nobel laureate Martin L. Perl, a professor emeritus in physics at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in Menlo Park, Calif., will be making a public presentation this Thursday at UC Davis along with his son, art critic Jed Perl. They will speak on the topic of the similarities and differences of the creative process in art and science. Martin Perl was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1995 for discovering a subatomic particle called the tau lepton. Perl will address the issue of creativity in art as opposed to creativity in science and engineering. “How similar are they?” Martin asks. “What do you need to become a highly creative person or more creative person?” Jed Perl has authored a number of nonfiction books on art criticism, including Eyewitness: Reports From An Art World In Crisis and Trevor Winkfield’s Pageant, a book about a one-of-a-kind, living artist whose paintings have been compared to music. He was the art critic for Vogue and currently writes for The New Republic. “Creativity has... ...

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Column: myTunes

Kick back, relax and imagine we’re taking a road trip together. We don’t know each other well (the trip was organized through a mutual friend) so conversation is scarce. After exchanging the usual pleasantries about our majors and the weather, we sit in silence as you continue to drive down the highway. Then, without permission, I reach over and grab your iPod and begin mercilessly perusing your music library, occasionally laughing to myself and shaking my head. Are you stressed out by this hypothetical scenario? Are you amazed that hypothetical Nolan is so rude and invasive? I am, and I was the one doing the perusing. I don’t think I’m alone in being overly protective of my musical preferences. And not protective in the confrontational “I’ll argue in defense of everything I’ve ever listened to” sense, but more in the “I change my iPhone password daily because my music is for my eyes and ears only” sense. Sound crazy? Alright, Courage McBravepants, try this one on for size. Go to... ...

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Universities turn to lecturers in place of tenured faculty during hard times

A trend sweeping across U.S. universities seems to have missed the University of California campus at Davis. The hiring of lecturers as a means of confronting budgetary concerns has yet to be implemented. The U.S. Department of Education cites the national average of “part-time faculty” as nearly 41 percent — a roughly 9 percent increase from 1993. In comparison, while a rise in both ladder faculty and teaching assistants has remained rather constant at UC Davis, the welcoming of lecturers has stalled and petered out over the past decade. In the 1997-98 school year Davis was home to 656 ladder faculty and 155 lecturers. Jump forward to this past year’s census and the number of ladder faculty has increased to 880, while the number of lecturers has dropped to 138. “Our campus certainly has no policy of increasing the numbers of lecturers at the expense of ladder-rank faculty,” said Vice Provost of Academic Affairs Maureen Stanton. Concern has been raised over the influx of lecturers at other institutions, arising chiefly... ...

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Who’s your favorite professor?

Every so often there is a teacher who extends office hours a precious two hours before the day of the midterm or sparks a communication major’s interest in organic chemistry that leads to an unexpected minor. The 10th annual ASUCD Excellence in Education Awards aim at making sure these educators are noticed and honored for their service. The awards are run and funded by the ASUCD Academic Affairs Commission (AAC). Students who put on the event hope to give their undergraduate peers a chance to show appreciation for the teachers and professors who go above and beyond when it comes to instructing. “We want to celebrate those teachers who we think are really dedicated toward teaching,” said Annemarie Stone, junior English major and ASUCD AAC Chair. “Because we go to a research university, I’m sure everybody’s had a professor that they could tell was here for mainly research, and we really want to cherish those professors who have found a good balance and really dedicate a lot of their time toward students.” Undergraduate students are the only individuals involved in nominating and ultimately deciding who will... ...

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Whole Earth Festival approaches, planning is in full swing

From May 11 to 13, the UC Davis Quad will become home to the 43rd annual Whole Earth Festival. For this event, which is a unit of ASUCD, a variety of local food vendors, performers, alternative-living educators and more will gather to both entertain and educate students about the values of living sustainably. Although there are several activities meant to entertain the festival-goers such as arts and crafts booths, live musicians and even massage tables, at the core of the festival is the goal of preserving the planet. “Both on campus and off campus we try and bring people together who are linked by the common goal of wanting to keep the earth a long-lasting place for us,” said Willee Roberts, a senior international relations major and Karma Patrol Supporter for the festival. As a Karma Patrol Supporter, Roberts is partially responsible for the recruitment of the group of 400 volunteers, dubbed the Karma Patrol (KP), needed to work in the event’s various areas, including the performance stages, the kids’... ...

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DQ University seeks to rebuild

When commuting between UC Davis and Winters, there seems to be a lot of open land strictly designated for farming. But one particular establishment within this expanse may sometimes go unnoticed — though new developments could re-establish its presence in the region. DQ University, a two-year community college for Native American tribes in California, has been in a process of regrowth since the school was shut down due to financial issues and loss of accreditation in 2005. This year may prove to be a momentous stride for DQ University in re-establishing courses, standard procedures and infrastructure. A pending partnership between DQ University and UC Davis’ Engineers Without Borders (EWB), an international nonprofit organization that offers sustainable solutions to developing regions around the world, would establish a five-year commitment to improve DQ University’s facilities. Should the partnership be approved by DQ University leaders, EWB will assess, design, build and monitor the university’s development. Assistance from civil, environmental, structural and water quality engineers would implement sustainable solutions for the upkeep of the... ...

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News-in-Brief: Undergraduate Research, Scholarship and Creative Activities Conference this weekend

The Undergraduate Research, Scholarship and Creative Activities Conference will be held on Friday and Saturday. The conference is an opportunity for students to present their work to the UC Davis community. Topics of research presented will range from the denial of genocide in Darfur to the effect of aspirin on cardiovascular disease. “We’ve always prepared and inspired our students to discover solutions to some of society’s most pressing problems,” said Patricia Turner, Vice Provost of Undergraduate Education, in a press release. “The Undergraduate Research, Scholarship and Creative Activities Conference gives our students a chance to exhibit the fruits of their research along with a taste of the process of presenting it in a scholarly manner.” This year, the event will also feature an art exhibit, which will allow students interested in design and creative studies to present their work. The event is free to the public. Students will present posters with information about their research on Friday in Freeborn Hall from 3 to 5:30 p.m., the Art Exhibit will take... ...

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“Algebra for all” policy flawed, according to study

Learning algebra too early in life could be more harmful than beneficial to some students, according to a new study conducted by UC Davis School of Education professors Michal Kurlaender and Heather Rose, along with education programs consultant Don Taylor. The study – which looks at low-performing eighth-grade students who are placed in algebra – holds negative implications for a policy that requires all eighth-grade students to take algebra. “I think the main message is that a ‘one size fits all’ policy is not likely to be effective, and that we need much more evidence about how policies may impact students across the achievement distribution,” Kurlaender said. “In other words, from the most successful students, those that perform at the average and those that struggle.” Current policies in action, as well as those proposed by the California Board of Education, support a belief that students who complete algebra are more successful. “Algebra is a critical gatekeeper for college and future academic success and so it is critical that everyone master... ...

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Softball preview

Teams: UC Davis vs. No. 19 Stanford; at UC Santa Barbara Records: Aggies, 18-25 (8-4); Cardinal 32-16; Gauchos 23-26 (8-4) Where: Smith Family Stadium — Stanford, Calif.; LaRue Field When: Today at 6 p.m.; Saturday at noon and 2 p.m.; Sunday at noon Who to watch: Despite getting just one hit in the weekend series against Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo, junior JJ Wagoner is providing solid offense for the Aggies this season. The outfielder from Napa, Calif. is hitting .275, has the second-highest batting average of all UC Davis starters and has a hit in eight of the last 10 games. Wagoner is also one of the most composed players at the plate as she has struck out just eight times this year — tied for the lowest amount by any starter. “She’s been working extremely hard,” said Head Coach Karen Yoder. “And it’s always nice to see when a player puts in the hard work and sees results.” Production from upperclassmen like Wagoner will be critical when the... ...

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Column: Scientific hoaxes

Last week, the subject of my column was of scientists being honest but wrong. This week, I want to talk about the other part of being wrong: being dishonest. Entire books can and have been filled with stories of infamous hoaxes by people with a variety of reasons (often money, sometimes fame, occasionally to prove a pet theory). Here are a few of the most infamous scientific hoaxes throughout history. I only included the ones where people have definitive proof of deception and that actually took place (urban legends don’t count). Piltdown Man: The Piltdown Man’s fame began in 1912, when Charles Dawson said at a paleontological meeting that he was given several fossil fragments by a workman at the Piltdown gravel pit. He took the finds to Arthur Smith Woodward, who was the geological keeper of the British Museum. Woodward assembled the fragments and declared that it was a skull of an evolutionary “missing link” between humans and apes due to its human-like cranium and its ape-like jaw. The... ...

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SHAWCing Tips

Prepare to be disgusted: Many products we use every day, such as lipstick, gelatin, candy and shampoo, contain dye. Even some foods we eat contain dye. The disgusting part? Dyes such as carmine contain minuscule amounts of Dactylopius coccus, which is a beetle that can be found on cacti. According to the World Health Organization, carmine has been known to be associated with asthma or allergic reactions.  Individuals who are more susceptible to asthmatic attacks or even allergens should look out for terms such as “crimson lake,” Natural Red #4, E120 or cochineal dye in the ingredients. Fortunately, Starbucks Corporation recently released a statement saying that the carmine dye in many of their strawberry-flavored foods will be replaced with lycopene, a tomato extract. It should be noted that not all food products contain the same cochineal dye; others use Red Dye #40, which is extracted from petroleum and also has side effects such as hyperactivity. Take a look at your food label — you might be surprised to see how... ...

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