The Ethical Hedonist: Panic! At The Cheese Aisle

Let me begin by introducing myself — my name is Hillary Knouse and I might reasonably be called a pseudo-environmentalist. That is to say, I live in cooperative housing and abide by most of the sustainable practices that come with it. I compost, I garden, I avoid paper towels like the plague and for nine months out of the year, I cook the vast majority of my meals without meat. On the other hand, I love driving alone in my car, I take 20-30 minute showers every morning and my brief, Lent-motivated foray into veganism last year was one of the most arduous experiences of my life (life without cheese may not be worth living). Let me be clear though, I don’t think that being a “real environmentalist” necessitates forgoing cheese, just as it shouldn’t necessitate forgoing showers. Like anything else, it simply requires thoughtfulness and moderation — and perhaps a greater modicum of self-control in the face of a Trader Joe’s sale on Gouda. Over the course of Lent’s... ...

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The Election Game Show

It may be too late to change anything for this year’s election, but let’s see if we can make the 2016 election go a little bit better. Here are some ideas that will make the elections fairer, more fun, more fact-based and less discriminating against third parties. First big change: no more human moderators. You may have heard the news about a year ago that IBM made a supercomputer, Watson, that can understand human language.  Watson should be given the questions to ask the candidates. Not only will a computer be completely impartial, but Watson would also be able to fact-check everything that each candidate said in real-time. How can debates based on fact be a bad thing? Now for the Presidential Election Game Show. The show works like this. Allow the third parties to participate in the debates. This simultaneously makes the election fairer, and makes it appeal to more of the population. All the presidential candidates, consisting of a few Democrats, a few Republicans, one or two from... ...

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Men’s Soccer Preview

Teams: UC Davis 9-6-4 (7-3-0) vs. Cal State Fullerton 13-6-0 (7-3-0) Where: Aggie Soccer Field When:  Wednesday at 2 p.m. Who to watch: Junior Alex Aguiar has been one of the Aggies’ most dangerous assets this year. He has been involved in five goals this season, including three of his own and two assists. The last time the Aggies faced off with Cal State Fullerton, Aguiar put away a penalty kick for one of the two goals UC Davis scored to take down the Titans. Aguiar has started all 19 games for UC Davis and has fired the most shots (35) and shots on goal (16) this season. Did you know: The Aggies are a testament to the statement “defense wins ballgames.” UC Davis ranked last in the conference in goals, assists and points. In the Aggies’ last nine games, they won seven contests due mostly in part to the fact that they allowed one goal or less in each game over this stretch. UC Davis scored 13 of its... ...

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UC Davis alumnus develops DavisWiki app

In an effort to make it easier to find locations and geographical references in the Davis area, Keyan Kousha, a 2012 graduate of UC Davis with a bachelor’s degree in computer science, developed a DavisWiki iPhone app. As a nonprofit, location-based wiki, the app depends on its users to share, add and edit locations. “The app is absolutely incredible, the amount of information that it gives is fantastic. The specific details … [make] navigating the campus as a freshman who’s really not that familiar with it yet much, much easier,” said Alex Parella, a first-year computer science major. Kousha was getting sick of having to use DavisWiki at home and was having trouble finding information about local businesses and buildings’ open hours and days, their history and other details. DavisWiki is a community wiki for the city of Davis. Users can edit and add information about the local area. “It made a lot of sense, so then it clicked. Someone else wasn’t going to develop it, so I did,” Kousha... ...

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Tech Tips

All research papers must start with researching your subject and finding legitimate sources. But what is the easiest and quickest way to get all that information? Here are just a couple of many underused resources that are available to all students. UC-eLinks UC Davis has a large store of electronic resources accessible online or in print for students to check out. Anyone can use this resource, but only UC faculty, students or staff have access to the UC-licensed e-journals and other full text resources. All of these resources are available automatically when on campus, or through the Library VPN when off campus. Using UC-eLinks In order to use this resource, simply link to a local campus or UC systemwide catalog holdings and go to cdlib.org/services/d2d/ucelinks/ to see if it has a certain item either in print or electronic format at any UC campus. The item or items will be delivered directly to you if you use your campus document delivery service, or you will be notified when the item arrives... ...

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Column: Rings and dolls

Sex toys aren’t a modern creation. The earliest recovered dildo is a 20-centimeter-long siltstone, made during the Paleolithic “tool era.” About 28,000 years ago, someone took time off from hunting mammoths and gathering berries in order to cut and polish this large phallus. But after silicone replaced stone and the ice that marked this era thawed, sex toy construction became a lot less labor-intensive. “Dildo,” in case you have been pondering the etymology, most likely stems from the 16th-century Italian word “diletto,” meaning “delight;” as in, “I am diletto to have purchased such an impressive diletto.” Ancient Greeks also used dildos, which they called olisbos, only the Greeks tended to lubricate theirs with olive oil. But the history of sex toys isn’t limited to wine and spaghetti country. In 500 A.D., Ben Wa balls, insertable metal spheres that rock against each other and have the tendency to fall out at potentially embarrassing moments, were invented in Japan. Cock rings, made from the skin surrounding a goat’s eye socket — complete... ...

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News in Brief: Davis Volunteer and Service Fair today on Quad

A volunteer and service fair will be held today on the Quad from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. The fair will offer students the opportunity to learn how they can contribute to the community and learn about existing on- and off-campus community service opportunities to get involved in and promotes student involvement and leadership experience. Over 60 charity and service organizations will be present at the fair. “We’re all looking to expand our resumes through various jobs and internships, and luckily we are exposed to many opportunities to do so while attending UC Davis,” Emily Alice Gerhart, External Affairs Commission Chair said. “However, the sense of gratitude and accomplishment that comes with volunteering is an experience unlike any other.” — Muna Sadek ...

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Female ovulation correlated to mate perception

As winter approaches, it seems as though many people’s relationship statuses are changing to “single.” Winter is the most popular season to break-up, peaking right before the holidays. While most couples chalk it up to having mutual differences, one reason for the disenchantment may be more scientific than once thought. UCLA researchers have found a correlation with female mate perception and ovulation, meaning that during a woman’s most fertile period, she is more likely to be distant from her more acquiescent and stable partner, and temporarily prefer a “dominant” male. Joseph Gonzales, a doctoral student at UC Davis, explained that the “good genes” fertile women look for in males are aspects such as a V-shape body, height, angular features and facial symmetry. These characteristics are universal indicators of masculinity and originate from testosterone levels. If a male has softer features and perhaps a more docile disposition, he will be perceived as less attractive by women when they are fertile. “[These] types of ovulatory effects are quite fascinating and have been... ...

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The Fluffies are here

The dogs are back. The UC Davis Stress and Wellness Center’s mindspa has brought their quarterly event back to campus. Therapy Fluffies are dogs that are brought to UC Davis to interact with students and help them to destress from the daily grind including exams, lectures and homework. “We host this event in hopes to relieve student’s stress during the busiest times in the quarter,” said Stephanee Gomez, a Student Health and Wellness Ambassador for CAPS. Enjoy the calming effects of these furry and lovable friends in the Quad from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. this afternoon. ...

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Dairy Field to open winter quarter

Renovation on the Dairy Road Recreation Field, one of two fields on the west side of campus used mainly for intramural sporting events, is drawing to a close. Located across the street from the Hutchison Field, next to the UC Davis Dairy, the field is a common area for sport practices and informal games. The renovation is estimated to cost about $4.5 million. John Campbell, executive director for the department of Campus Recreation and Unions (CRU), said that despite some complications with overseas shipping meeting delivery dates, the overall project is expected to be completed by its scheduled date at the end of fall 2012 and it will be fully operational for the start of winter 2013. The initial estimated date of completion was October 2012. The new field will incorporate a synthetic play-surface that will allow activity during the raining season. Because the field enjoys frequent use, both students and faculty involved in the project are eager for its completion. Students living in the Tercero residence halls often need... ...

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News in Brief: Entrepreneurship Fund hosts expert panel today

An ASUCD Entrepreneurship Fund (E-Fund) panel, titled “Start-Ups, Socially-Conscious Business, and You” will be held today at 5 p.m. in Griffin Lounge at the Memorial Union. The event will feature entrepreneurs and investors that will share personal perspectives and provide advice to those looking to venture into entrepreneurship. Experts will also speak on technology start-ups, non-profit management versus a socially-responsible business and investors’ approaches to viable start-ups. Those in attendance are encouraged to meet and talk with speakers and other guests in the social mixer that will follow the panel, according to the event news release. Guest speakers will include Wil Agatstein, Executive Director of the UC Davis Institute got Innovation & Entrepreneurship, Tom and Amanda Arthur, CEO and Vice President of Sales for OptTown, respectively, Hoss Bozorgzad, Angel Investor and Founder & CEO of GCR Inc., Roy Choi, CEO and Executive Producer of Kollaboration and Vanessa Errecarte, former Director of the California Fire Foundation. More information can be found on the ASUCD Entrepreneurship Fund Facebook page. — Muna Sadek ...

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ASUCD Senate candidates participate in election forum

All 14 ASUCD Senate candidates participated in an forum at the ASUCD Coffee House yesterday at noon. The event, sponsored by the ASUCD Elections Committee and moderated by The California Aggie, gave candidates the opportunity to explain their platforms, goals and priorities to student voters in attendance. Each candidate was given one minute to answer each question and the floor was later opened to audience questions. Questions asked included topics such as the relationship between UC Davis administration and students, maintaining transparency at the Senate table, advancement toward a greener campus, ethnic graduations and ways in which candidates planned to complete their campaign platforms. Kirby Araullo, Olivia Brown, Armando Figueroa, Lee Lo and Alyson Noele Sagala are running with the SMART (Students Matter: Activism, Retention, Teamwork) slate; Felicia Ong, Kevin Pelstring, Jonathan Yip, Robert Helfend and Tal Topf are running with the NOW slate and Liam Burke, Maxwell Kappas, Davis Belcher and Gloria Chen are independent candidates. ASUCD Senate elections will take place Nov. 13 to 16 and more information... ...

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Column: Insomnia

Red, bleary eyes stare listlessly at the red digital numbers as they tick upward at an alarming rate. 4:42 a.m. 4:43 a.m. 4:44 a.m. Each arriving minute brings with it a sense of impending anxiety and a myriad of questions and thoughts, thus further exacerbating this cycle of sleeplessness. Your eyes shift from the stoic clock, which offers no solace, to the comforting stucco lines undulating gently on the ceiling. And just when your eyelids finally begin to feel heavy and the call of sleep feels like it’s whispering right into your ear, the roosters start crowing, the sun’s rays begin to peek pervasively through the blinds and an entirely new day looms menacingly at your bedpost. From then on, the rest of the day is a shit storm. Your pants are inside out, your socks don’t match, you drank two double mocha shot espressos with light froth and ate a Pop-Tart for breakfast. You’re nodding off in lecture, sneaking into the bathroom stall at work to get some shut-eye... ...

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Smart therapy

Much of disease treatment relies on a simple principle: find out what agents in the body are causing a problem and eliminate them. People can employ very broad-sweeping measures to eliminate these problems. A good example of this is the use of antibiotics. For diseases like salmonella and tetanus, the use of the proper antibiotics can quickly and efficiently solve the problem. However, many diseases are much more problematic and can’t be dealt with in broad strokes. The treatments for these diseases are much more complex and require pinpoint accuracy in targeting afflicted areas. One such disease is cancer. Cancer, the unregulated growth of the body’s cells, is difficult to treat. The difficulty stems from the fact that the diseased cells are entirely native to the body; the treatments are targeting one’s own cells. The body’s immune system is great at detecting and eliminating foreign substances, but when the troubles are more domestic, it has trouble telling healthy cells from cancerous ones. As a result, the treatment options that kill... ...

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Culture week honors indigenous heritage

As November is Native American Heritage Month, the Cross Cultural Center (CCC) is presenting Native American Culture Days (NACD) this week on campus to spread awareness. NACD was actually established on the UC Davis campus in the 1970s during a time of social unrest as a way to celebrate Native American culture. “Native American people wanted a voice on this campus and they established NACD along with the Native American Powwow to let people know that they are not historical — they are very much alive today, working to preserve cultures and carry on traditions and ceremonies,” said Melissa Johnson, the Native American staff program coordinator for the CCC. Johnson is a member of the Euchee tribe from the Muskogee Nation in Oklahoma. The theme for this year’s NACD is “Honoring the Indigenous Peoples of the Americas: Power in Unity and Strength in Diversity.” Johnson said they aim to include not only Native American culture, but other indigenous cultures as well. “We celebrate the indigenous peoples of the Americas and... ...

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