Alice Waters and Michael Pollan at UC Berkeley, and on YouTube

Every foodie at UC Davis knows, and cringes at the fact, that the Michael Pollan is chilling at UC Berkeley, lecturing and stuff on a regular basis. It’s so close, and yet so far. To make matters even worse, the Alice Waters — famed chef/owner of Chez Panisse and American pioneer of seasonal, sustainable cooking practices — was guest lecturing at Pollan’s class last Tuesday night. Luckily, all of Pollan’s Edible Education lectures are posted on YouTube here, so we Davis-ites can pretend to be auditing the course every week. Here’s the video of Waters. She starts speaking at about 10:15, stops at the 50th minute and answers a few student questions at the 1-hour-20-minute mark. She talks about trying to spread Slow Food values in a nation built on a fast food culture. What is fast food culture? It’s why so many American consumers think fresh tomatoes grow year-round. It’s the idea that we want everything fast, cheap and easy. Also, see pictures of UC Berkeley from when Waters attended... ...

Read More →

Police Briefs

FRIDAY Futile spat Someone’s neighbor spit in their direction but the spit didn’t reach them on Creekhollow Lane. SATURDAY Catfight Someone was trying to get their cat back, so they met up with the person who had taken it. The other person came to their meeting spot with a group of friends and proceeded to beat up the cat owner on Chiles Road. Piss drunk An inebriated minor went into Little Prague on G Street and urinated inside. Petty theft A person had their identity stolen and the identity thief used the person’s email to send obscene things to their mother on Hanover Drive. U mad, bro? Someone’s unarmed brother was in their apartment, but they didn’t want him there on Cowell Boulevard. When it rains, it pours Someone was wandering around in the rain searching the parking lot for two and a half hours because they couldn’t find their car at University Mall on Russell Boulevard. Police briefs are compiled from the City of Davis daily crime bulletins. Contact... ...

Read More →

Stressing your way to an A

During finals week, most of us will be cramming in the 24-Hour Study Room, holed up in some corner of Shields Library, or locked away in our apartments studying. Finals week puts a lot of demands on students who might have three to four exams, final papers due and sometimes project presentations to give or portfolios to turn in. Around this time, students get bombarded with excessive amounts of advice to de-stress. Common themes include taking a 10-minute nap, going for a run, meditating and most definitely getting enough sleep at night. But 10-minute naps pretty easily turn into several hours of unintended sleep. Going for a run always takes longer than expected because people need to shower and eat. Meditating sounds nice, but in reality, not many people know how. And on the topic of reality, the stressed and strung-out will not be sleeping eight hours a night next week. So for the overworked, slightly behind or potentially desperate students, de-stressing too much might not be ideal. In fact,... ...

Read More →

Column: Recess, running… performance?

When No Child Left Behind passed under the Bush administration, schools suddenly received tremendous pressure to raise the reading and math capabilities of all of their students. This led a number of schools to examine their curriculum and courses and decide what they could cut in order to devote more time to “teaching the test.” The end result was that many schools cut and/or reduced time spent on recess and physical education, as well as arts, social studies and science. This is quite simply a terrible idea. As many of you have probably heard, obesity is becoming a major problem in the United States. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention reports that 17 percent of children and adolescents aged two to 19 are obese, almost triple the rate in 1980. Why is this happening? Because of childhood habits. Cutting recess and PE classes to keep up in math and English is only going to make obesity an even greater problem. But this isn’t the main reason I’m criticizing the... ...

Read More →

Men’s soccer season in review

The men’s soccer team’s season ended on a solemn, yet encouraging note a couple of weeks ago at home. The team ended its season with a 1-0 loss to South Division Championships, Cal State Northridge. UC Davis finished with a 10-7-4 overall record and an 8-4 record in the Big West Conference. The team played very well against CSU Northridge in general, but was unable to recover from an early goal from Matador Sagi Lev-Ari at the 15:45 mark. Lev-Ari put away his 14th goal of the season on an assist from Chris Smith. Smith passed the ball to Lev-Ari in the middle of the field, who fired a hard shot at the crossbar for the 1-0 lead. Junior goalkeeper Omar Zeenni recorded two saves and several players fired five shots at the goal, but the team was held at zero goals for the entirety of the game. In the 40th minute, freshman forward Eric Budniewski’s strike from outside the 18-yard box was knocked away by Matador goalkeeper Michael Abalos.... ...

Read More →

School of Medicine dean to step down in June

UC Davis School of Medicine Dean Claire Pomeroy will step down next June, according to a Nov. 19 news release from the UC Davis Health System. Pomeroy joined UC Davis in 2003 and was appointed as dean in 2005. She also serves as the vice chancellor for Human Health Sciences. Pomeroy said her departure is the next step of her career, as she aims to promote health system reform on a national scale. “I am progressively having an interest in having a national voice [in] healthcare reform, how we redesign the health care delivery system and health profession education going forward,” she said. “I’m glad to represent the university medical center in Washington, D.C., and then explore other possibilities on the national scene that can advance healthcare and health research.” Pomeroy said she has had a personal interest in advocating for the medical center and health system for a long time and has thought about moving on for over a year. After holding a number of prestigious positions and being... ...

Read More →

News in Brief: UC Davis and Davis police fail to catch indecent exposure suspect

On Saturday, a man led the UC Davis Police Department (UCDPD) and Davis Police Department (DPD) on a wild goose chase. The UCDPD received a call at 3:53 p.m. that the man was masturbating in the UC Davis Arboretum. Once approached by a UC Davis police officer, the suspect fled. The suspect proceeded to run through the Arboretum and Aggie Village before jumping over a fence at First and C streets. As the suspect fled through backyards of residences, three more officers joined the aforementioned officer. The DPD also sent six of their cruisers to follow suit. At 4:40 p.m., the officers discontinued their search because the suspect was unable to be located. The indecent exposure suspect is described as a 6-foot-tall white male in his 20s, last seen wearing black running clothes. — Claire Tan ...

Read More →

Column: Goodbye, Davis

UC applications were due this past Friday. As I helped my little sister polish her personal statements before submission, I became nostalgic about all the things I will miss about Davis. There are so many — the baby ducks in the Arboretum, Gunrock’s crazy antics at football and basketball games, playing Humans vs. Zombies in the Death Star. I challenge you to truly take pride in our school and our city. We are ushering in the next generation of Aggies and I want us all to take a moment to appreciate just how freakin’ awesome Davis is. I’ve often heard people say things like “Davis is boring” and “There’s nothing to do here.” I even saw a YouTube parody about stereotypes of the “typical” UC Davis student’s day, in which the main character spent all his time with cows, counting the days since he got rejected from Berkeley. What the heck, dude? For someone to feel that way, they must not be very involved, because there is such an array... ...

Read More →

Doin’ It Green during finals

Finals definitely have a big impact on your grades every quarter, but as you hit the books and start some serious studying, there are some things you can do to reduce your impact on the planet. When you go to the bookstore to buy your blue books, EPPC would strongly encourage you to purchase a green book. They cost the same amount as traditional blue books but are more sustainable and green because they’re made of 100 percent recycled paper, with 30 percent from post-consumer waste. If you’re nervous your professor won’t accept them for some reason, even though they are the same, just ask beforehand! If you use caffeine to get you through finals, bring a reusable cup or thermos to hold your beverage, whether you’re drinking half-priced coffee from the ASUCD Coffee House or tea from Peet’s. When you’re studying for those exams, don’t print out papers unnecessarily — you can highlight PDFs and edit almost anything in a Google Doc. However, if you do choose to print... ...

Read More →

Editorial: Greek life

On Nov. 4, Mason Sumnicht celebrated his 21st birthday with the Sigma Pi brothers of CSU Chico. After attempting 21 shots, Sumnicht died of alcohol poisoning. 10 days later, CSU Chico suspended their entire Greek life system from all recruitment and social activities until Spring semester. UC Davis and other universities have begun to reevaluate safety management for their respective Greek systems. Although we recognize that our campus holds no notoriety as a “party school,” we still extend a word of caution to the Greek system of UC Davis. With the recent suspension of Sigma Alpha Epsilon due to repeated alcohol violations this year, the administration has already demonstrated its willingness to punish for the sake of safety. It comes as no stretch of the imagination to see our entire Greek system suffer a similar fate if more chapters behave irresponsibly. We should uphold our history as a safe and responsible student body. With rush events to commence next quarter, fraternities and sororities should keep safety in mind. ...

Read More →

New seminar next quarter outlines infrastructure of orphanages

On an average day, most people aren’t thinking about the lives of orphan children in Sudan or Saudi Arabia who are possibly experiencing a life of political turmoil, social unrest and dangerously unhealthy living conditions. But, after over six months of research digging deep into the lack of international standards for orphanages across the globe, three UC Davis students have joined with the Experimental College to offer a “Capturing the Orphan Crisis” seminar next quarter. “I’ve never had a job where I was searching through pictures and need to cry all of a sudden,” said Lindsey Black, a fourth-year history major and student researcher. “There are some really devastating things that just have to be known and that’s why we decided to do the seminar.” The free-of-cost seminar will be put on through the Experimental College’s Alternative Learning Project for the entire Winter Quarter. “The experimental college is an outlet for individuals to share what they’re passionate about in an informal, open setting,” said Stacey Lee, Experimental College course coordinator... ...

Read More →

Editorial: Senate

At Thursday night’s ASUCD Senate meeting, it was announced that all senators-elect would be seated. The meeting room was overflowing with attendees, many of whom were supporters of Alyson Sagala, the only candidate who was denied her seat at the start of the day by the Elections Committee. The committee originally ruled in favor of an observation reported involving Sagala, alleging illegal campaigning within 100 feet of a polling location. However, they ultimately ruled that the complaints were invalid because they were filed against the slate, not the individual candidate. Other complaints filed seemed more politically motivated. This included a complaint against the SMART slate for failing to list the purchase of alcohol for a party on an expenditure report, a complaint against NOW for inappropriate location of fliers and a complaint against the SMART slate by a NOW candidate, alleging being called a racist by SMART supporters. Fortunately, all of these complaints have been resolved and the table can get on with their jobs and we can stop feeling... ...

Read More →

Odd Fellows Hall kicks off holidays with local bands

This Thursday, the Odd Fellows Hall, located at 415 Second St., will be kicking off the holiday season with Christmas music performed by nine local bands. The kickoff will be held at its monthly Thursday Live! show. Performances will begin at 7:30 p.m. and will be open and free to the public. The holiday show will feature local bands such as Biscuits and Honey, Frankie and the Fabletones, Me & Him and many more. Yolo Mambo, a local quartet that plays acoustic world jazz music, has a sound created by a Spanish guitar, a string bass, percussions and vocals. Yolo Mambo was started four years ago by four local residents. “At the Christmas show, we’ll be playing some Christmas songs. One of them is going to be ‘Santa Baby’ and two others [will be] surprise songs,” said Yolo Mambo Spanish guitarist Phil Summers. Like the other featured artists, Yolo Mambo’s songs will be fully arranged by the band, who will play their renditions of classic Christmas songs. “My husband and... ...

Read More →

Mike Gravel visits UC Davis

Former U.S. Democratic senator Mike Gravel spoke to students last Thursday at Wellman Hall at an event hosted by the Davis Democratic Socialists. Best known for his attempts to filibuster the Vietnam war draft and his release of the Pentagon Papers, he covered subjects ranging from the war on drugs to the war on terrorism, in addition to a recount of his experiences as a senator. Gravel also promoted his current movement advocating direct democracy in America. The talk itself was a collaboration between Brett Lemke, a fifth-year evolutionary anthropology major, and the Davis Democratic Socialists club. “I wanted the campus to hear his viewpoint,” Lemke said, “There are very few people who have had the courage and integrity to stand up like him.” Lemke worked with Gravel on his 2008 campaign for president and came to know him personally. Gravel also has a hand in The National Citizen’s Initiative for Democracy, a constitutional amendment providing for the institution of a legislature of the people, in which all citizens can... ...

Read More →

UC system sees increase in private funding

Over the past fiscal year, the University of California (UC) system has received over $1.56 billion from private support. According to the 2011-12 annual report on the UCs’ private support, this is considered a tremendous increase from previous years. Over the past decade, the amount in private support has steadily risen. According to 2010-11 annual private support report, in 2008-09 about $1.3 billion was received. In 2009-10, about $1.35 billion was received. In 2010-11, $1.58 billion was received. The money is being used to recruit faculty, build research facilities and expand student scholarships. According to Daniel Dooley, senior vice president for external relations of the UC Office of the President (UCOP), philanthropic funding is becoming an increasingly important part of the UC budget, although it will never fully replace state funding. “As our state funds have fallen, we’ve seen donors step up to create more endowed faculty chairs and student scholarships, gifts that go right to the heart of our funding challenges,” Dooley said in a press release. Each campus... ...

Read More →