Campus Judicial Report

Five more minutes
A first-year student was referred to Student Judicial Affairs (SJA) for cheating on an exam after time was called in an economics course. The professor saw him talk with a friend and change his answers on the exam after the exam period had ended. When meeting with a judicial officer, the student denied cheating, but admitted to working on the exam after time was called. He agreed to one year of probation, special seating arrangements for all future exams and community service as sanctions. Probation means that the student will likely be suspended or dismissed if he is found in violation again, but he retains his right to a formal hearing if he disputes the charges.

You were warned
A fourth-year student was referred to SJA for submitting an assignment in a University Writing Program course that contained plagiarism. When meeting with a judicial officer, he admitted to plagiarizing despite receiving handouts on plagiarism at the beginning of the quarter. He agreed to Deferred Separation and community service as sanctions. In addition, he received an “F” grade on the paper. Deferred Separation means that if he is again referred to SJA for any kind of theft or misappropriation, he has the right to an informal hearing with a judicial officer but has given up his right to a formal hearing.

Don’t let history repeat itself
A first-year student was referred to SJA for using a cell phone to cheat during an exam in a history course. The class was warned that having cell phones out during the exam implies cheating. When meeting with a judicial officer, the student admitted to using a cell phone during the exam for reasons other than cheating. He agreed to censure as sanction out of benefit of doubt. In addition, he received zero points on the exam. Censure is a written notice of a violation of policy. If he commits another violation, he will receive further discipline.

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