Review Category : Campus News

UC Davis offered the chance to discover “Roots of Inspiration”

  On Saturday, TEDxUCDavis will be hosting its first salon of the year from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Tickets will be $5 for Davis students and $7 for non-students. TEDxUCDavis is an independently organized version of the globally-renowned TED (Technology, Entertainment, Design) Conferences. TED Conferences, popularized by the release of “TED Talks” online (many of which are available via Netflix and Youtube), are based around the simple premise of sharing ideas. Speakers are allotted a maximum of 18 minutes to share their ideas and perspectives on a nearly unlimited range of topics. Sam Hodges, a fourth-year film studies major, attested to the effectiveness of the viral speeches. “[The speakers and format] make TED Talks very engaging,” Hodges said. “Our generation can have a very short attention span and [some of the topics covered in TED Conferences] can get dry very quickly, but the speakers [at TED events] are both knowledgeable and charismatic.” TEDxUCDavis features a similar format, but with a focus on themes that are more specifically suited for the... ...

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Davis Police holds open dialogue on military vehicle acquisition

The Davis Police Department (DPD) held an open dialogue on Nov. 13, in the Davis Senior Center to discuss the June 2014 acquisition of the Mine-Resistant Ambush Protected vehicle (MRAP) from the federal government. With over nearly 60 people including city council members, the DPD and the general public, the event aimed to conduct a dialogue with different groups within the community. To begin the dialogue, participants were told to write one word on a piece of paper to be posted around the room. Several words posted include “militarization,” “overkill,” “unity” and “fear”. One attendee expressed her concern for the lack of information and communication between the community, council and police prior to the acquisition of MRAP. Many attendants questioned the appropriateness of an armored vehicle for Davis. One of the posted papers read, “MRAP [is not an] image of what Davis needs.” Assistant Chief of the DPD Darren Pytel explained the benefits of the acquisition, which included insertion into high-threat environment, officer protection, higher leverage in negotiations and exceptionally... ...

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UC Davis researchers win USDA research award

This November, UC Davis professors Patrick Brown, Jan Hopmans and Ken Shackel, along with retired UC Cooperative Extension Specialist Larry Schwankl, received the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture’s 2014 Experiment Station Section Excellence in Multistate Research Award. This award acknowledges universities’ multistate research projects. These researchers received this honor for their work in the project “Microirrigation for Sustainable Water Use.” The project, which includes research on micro-irrigation, irrigation scheduling and fertilization, works toward increasing water efficiency. Contributions from these UC Davis researchers have included the development of sensors and irrigation technologies to increase water irrigation efficiency, as well as methods of relaying water conservation knowledge to others. “Over the years members of the group have jointly contributed [to] irrigation sessions at academic conferences, cooperated in writing irrigation textbooks and recently developed an award-winning website for maintenance of micro-irrigation systems,” Shackel said. “It is probably surprising to some how maintenance of micro-irrigation systems could be the subject of academic research, but interactions between water chemistry, microbiology, insects and irrigation... ...

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UC Davis earns USDA honor for agricultural efforts in Afghanistan

On Nov. 5, Jim Hill, associate dean for International Programs at the UC Davis College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, and Michael McGirr, national program leader of the U.S. Department of Agriculture National Institute for Food and Agriculture’s Center for International Programs, were presented with the 2014 USDA Secretary’s Honor Award in Washington, D.C. The Afghanistan Agricultural Extension Project, an effort led by UC Davis and three other U.S. universities, took the award within the global food security category, considered the USDA’S most prestigious award. The honor recognizes exceptional leadership efforts, contributions or public service in support of the mission and goals of USDA. In fall of 2011, UC Davis was selected as the lead institution for the Extension Project after a competitive process among a group of three other agricultural universities — Purdue University, Washington State University and the University of Maryland. The Extension Project was coordinated to help rebuild Afghanistan’s agricultural industry in conjunction with Afghanistan’s Ministry of Agriculture, Irrigation and Livestock. “The primary goal of our project... ...

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UC Board of Regents passes tuition plan

This morning, a committee of the University of California (UC) Board of Regents approved UC President Janet Napolitano’s tuition plan, which would increase UC tuition by up to five percent annually over the next five years. The board voted 7-2 in favor of the plan at its meeting held at the UCSF Mission Bay campus. California Gov. Jerry Brown voted against the plan, as did Student Regent Sadia Saifuddin. Hundreds of students from different UC campuses protested outside the event, and the San Francisco Chronicle reported that demonstrators “burst through metal barricades and police security lines and broke a large glass entry door.” UC Davis students who protested the regents meeting will continue their protest on the UC Davis campus this afternoon beginning at 3:30 p.m. They plan to occupy Mrak Hall — the main office building of UC Davis administrators — where many protesters spent the night of Nov. 18. The full Board of Regents will review the plan tomorrow, Nov. 20. ...

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Students lead protest in response to impending tuition hikes

Update (11/19/14, 1:30 p.m.): The UC Board of Regents passed Napolitano’s tuition plan this morning, Nov. 19, 7-2.    Three years to the day of the infamous pepper spray incident involving campus police and student demonstrators, UC Davis students once again filled the Quad this afternoon to protest, this time in response to impending tuition hikes. An estimated 500-600 students, faculty and community members convened in the center of the Quad at noon, Nov. 18, to make speeches, develop signs and mobilize the crowd to march across campus in protest of University of California (UC) President Janet Napolitano’s proposed UC tuition plan, which would increase UC tuition by up to five percent annually over the next five years. The UC Board of Regents will vote tomorrow, Nov. 19, at its meeting on the UCSF Mission Bay campus, on whether or not to implement the tuition plan. UC officials hope that the plan will pressure California state legislators and Gov. Jerry Brown to increase UC funding. Protesters marched through campus, chanting “Whose... ...

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Artsweek

MUSIC   Irvin Mayfield and the New Orleans Jazz Orchestra Nov. 18, 8 p.m., prices vary Mondavi Center for the Performing Arts Grammy-winning trumpeter Irvin Mayfield will lead the 18-piece New Orlean Jazz Orchestra through New Orleans musical classics and works by Basie and Ellington. There will be a 7 p.m. pre-performance talk in Jackson Hall.   Instagon with Suzuki Junzo, Chopstick, and more Nov. 23, 7 p.m., $5 The Morgue, 1919 Wahl Way This house show will feature performances by bands Suzuki Junzo (touring from Japan), Chopstick, Instagon, Mulva Myiasis with the Dutchess and Friends.   ART   Village Homes Arts & Crafts Fair Nov. 22, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., free Village Homes Community Cente, 2661 Portage Bay East This craft fair features woodblock prints, functional pottery, nature artwork, jewelry, paintings, knitted goods, handmade books, beeswax candles and much more. Live music and free hot chocolate / cider will be provided.   Davis Art Salon: Synesthesia Nov. 22, 7 to 9 p.m., free Richard L. Nelson Gallery The... ...

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Volunteers, artists, Davis residents support unique local museum

A little over a year ago, a man carried a 89-pound iron ball into the Hattie Weber Museum, located on C Street in Downtown Davis. The iron ball had sat atop Davis’s first water tower, previously functioning as a lightning rod. The man’s father-in-law, who was moving to a rest home, told the volunteers at the museum that every Fourth of July, the Davis Fire Chief would crawl on top of the water tower, grab the iron ball and stand on his head to the general cheers of the masses below. This iron ball is just one of many curious artifacts donated to the Hattie Weber Museum. Situated in the corner of Davis’ Central Park, the little building exhibits a wide range of objects that each hold a little piece of Davis’ history: a locked safe that not even an expert could open, a quilt made during the Civil War, a till from the 1920s that can ring up no more than $9.99 and creamers from when UC Davis first... ...

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UC Davis researchers discover fossils that fill missing evolutionary gap

On Nov. 5, UC Davis released that a team led by campus researchers discovered the first fossil of an amphibious ichthyosaur that fills a missing part of the dinosaurs’ evolutionary period. The fossil represents the transition from land to sea in the evolutionary history of ichthyosaurs, marine reptiles from the Age of Dinosaurs. “Ichthyosaurs are fish-shaped externally but their skeletons are reptilian, suggesting that they descended from four-legged land reptiles and evolved into a fish-shape over time,” said team member and Professor Ryosuke Motani from the department of earth and planetary sciences. “However, no fossil was known to represent this transition from land to sea.” Between 2010 and 2012, the team, consisting of scientists from UC Davis, Peking University, Anhui Geological Museum, Chinese Academy of Science, University of Milan and The Field Museum in Chicago, led multi-year excavations in Chaohu City, Anhui Province of China. The fossil was discovered in 2011, and almost two years were spent in the lab studying and analyzing the fossil before the team noticed significant... ...

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UC students protest against proposed tuition hike

The ASUCD and a coalition of student organizations and labor unions have called UC Davis students to gather on the Quad for a campuswide protest on Nov. 18 at noon against the possible tuition hike. Event coordinators expect upwards of 1,500 students to participate. The action is a response to University of California (UC) President Janet Napolitano’s proposed Long-Term Stability Plan, which implies a five percent rise in tuition fees annually for all UC undergraduate and graduate students over the next five years. This would likely raises tuition to $15,564 tuition by the academic year of 2019-20 (compared to the current amount of $12,192). The UC Board of Regents will consider the Long-Term Stability Plan during its meeting at UC San Francisco Mission Bay Campus on Wednesday. “We oppose the tuition hike because education is a right and it should not be cost-prohibitive,” said Harvey Litzelman, director of the ASUCD Office of Advocacy and Student Representation, a second-year sociology major and one of the organizers of the UC Davis protest... ...

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Northern California Kaiser nurses strike ends

At 7 a.m. this morning, the Northern California Kaiser nurses strike involving 18,000 nurses came to an end at some 86 Kaiser Permanente hospitals and clinics. They have been on strike since Monday, according to a California Nurse Association (CNA) released statement due to the U.S. hospitals’ inadequate Ebola safeguards. According to the CNA, lowered care standards for Ebola patients, nurses and other healthcare workers are among the reasons for the strike. “Our call for a strike speaks loudly and clearly that we want management to stop their stalling in bargaining our first contract, stop the unfair labor practices and provide the safeguards and resources needed to deliver safe patient care. It’s high time to listen to the nurses,” said Sutter Tracy RN Dotty Nygard in a statement released by the CNA. Kaiser Permanente said in a statement that they have met the criteria the nurses have asked for when it comes to provisions for treating Ebola. The statement says that Kaiser has tried to work with the National Nurses... ...

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UC Davis Police launches online crime reporting system

The UC Davis Police Department launched a crime reporting system last month that provides the student community with a venue to report minor crimes online. The police department worked with a software service company, COPLOGIC, to create a reporting system that will allow students and faculty to report crimes such as theft, vandalism, car burglary, lost property or other minor incidents online. “We created this system to allow students to report minor crimes at their convenience without having to wait in line to speak to an officer,” said Mark Spangler, the police department’s Support Services manager. “We hope students will respond positively by filling out reports at their own convenience between classes.” The crime must be minor and a non-emergency occurring on campus. Emergencies will not be accepted by the system and must be reported by calling 911 or (530) 572-1230. “For those students who are hesitant to contact the police department, this will offer a different avenue to file reports,” said Dispatch Supervisor Leticia Garcia-Hernandez, who worked on the... ...

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UC Davis students win international engineering competition with innovative biosensor

Picture 1 (from left to right): Brian Tamsut, James Lucas, Sarah Ritz, Simon Staley, Yeonju Song, Aaron Cohen, Randy Rettberg (President at iGEM Foundation), Marc T. Facciotti (student advisor), Lucas Murray Picture 2: Sarah Ritz and Lucas Murray testing the quality of olive oil with their electrochemical biosensor A team of UC Davis student inventors won the Grand Prize in the “overgraduate division” at the 2014 iGEM (International Genetically Engineered Machines) competition in Boston last week. The group developed an electrochemical biosensor that can measure the quality of olive oil. 70 percent of the olive oil sold in the United States is already rancid although labeled as fresh, according to a 2010 study by the UC Davis Olive Oil Center. The team sought to fix this problem. “By consuming rancid olive oil, you’re not getting the health benefits and flavor that you paid for,” said Sarah Ritz, a fourth-year biochemistry and molecular biology major who was one of the six group members who spent her summer working on the biosensor.... ...

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UC Davis wins Causeway Classic Blood Drive

On Nov. 4 and 5, UC Davis won BloodSource’s seventh annual Causeway Classic Blood Drive in a friendly competition with Sacramento State. UC Davis has now won the blood drive for the fourth time since its first occurrence in 2008. The blood drive is a competition between UC Davis and Sacramento State in terms of numbers of participants. UC Davis won the competition by a mere 11 donors. UC Davis had a total of 1,653 participants, 43 of whom donated at a different donation center during the competition time frame. Sacramento State had 1,642 participants, 25 of whom donated at an alternative center. Both campuses drew impressive turnouts, as 3,295 students donated blood in total. Felicia Roper, the account manager for BloodSource, managed the event for the UC Davis campus and released the final results. She said that this was the closest margin of victory for either campus during the competition’s history and that UC Davis now leads Sacramento State 4-3. According to Alexander Sigua, public relations manager for BloodSource,... ...

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Sacramento, Placer County citizens remember fallen deputies

Deputy Danny Oliver and Deputy Michael Davis Jr., two officers who were killed in an Oct. 24 shooting rampage, were laid to rest at Adventure Christian Church in Roseville, Calif. Oct. 27 and Oct. 28. An estimated 3,000 people were in attendance at both services, as reported by The Sacramento Bee. “The citizens and communities have shown great support in response to this incident.  From phone calls, emails, social media posts, letters, flowers and visits, to hosting candlelight vigils, fundraisers, donations, support at funeral services. [Their] presence at an organized funeral ceremony or procession is overwhelming to officers and survivors who serve the community,” said Sergeant Lisa R. Bowman, the sheriff’s spokesperson for the Sacramento County Sheriff’s Department. The Oct. 24 shooting turned into a six-hour manhunt, which included the participation of the California Highway Patrol (CHP), Sacramento Police Department, Sacramento County Probation, State Parole, and the FBI — with a team of around 300 officers — along with citizen cooperation. Alleged shooter Luis Enrique Monroy-Bracamonte — accompanied by his... ...

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