Review Category : City News

Breakthrough study to ensure fish safety under water dams

On Oct. 15, BioScience Advance Access published a study conducted by UC Davis associate research scientist Joshua H. Viers, UC Davis fish biology professor Peter Moyle and U.S. geological survey research scientist Theodore Grantham. This study resulted in a method to ensure the safety of endangered fish by ensuring sufficient water flow under California water dams. Due to the drought in California, water dam owners are reluctant to ensure sufficient water flow underneath their dams. The motivation for the study began with the researchers’ concern for the rapid decline in fish populations. “Eighty percent of fish endemic to California are facing extinction within the next 100 years if something does not change,” Grantham said. Grantham also explained that the problem of declining fish population has existed for quite a while, but finding a conceivable solution was still complicated. In an article written by Grantham and Moyle on the California WaterBlog, they found their clear start to fix the problem. The WaterBlog article states, “[the screening process] provides a scientific basis... ...

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News in Brief: Davis Bicycles to discuss city bicycle infrastructure at open forum

Davis Bicycles!, a non-profit advocacy group concerned with bicycle infrastructure in Davis, is holding a discussion tonight, Nov. 6, on how to improve bicycle infrastructure in Davis. Rock Miller, a UC Davis Graduate who is now working in an engineering firm focusing on street design, will be a speaker at the event. “[Miller]…[has] knowledge of our community and our bicycling program here,” said Steve Tracy, vice president of Davis Bicycles!. Miller’s focus has been on street designs that accommodate pedestrian and bicycles, or as Tracy said, “complete streets.” He has conducted research on the infrastructure of roads in European cities where bike ridership is up to 40 or 50 percent of the population. The event will introduce contemporary road designs and include an open forum. “We want to learn from somebody who’s an expert in the field, who can show us more contemporary designs that feel safer and are safer, [in order] to increase our ridership,” Tracy said. Davis Bicycles! expects an equal number of guests from both Davis Bicycles!... ...

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California drought urges Yosemite National park to take preventive action to avoid negative human interactions with bears

Since September this year Yosemite National Park rangers have begun to install GPS trackers on some of their bear population in efforts to ameliorate the potential negative effects of California’s drought on the bears. Over the last few months, there have been significantly more bear sightings in human areas than typical for Yosemite Valley. Experts say bears may be seeking alternative food supplies due to limited natural food supply available as a result of the drought. “During drought conditions, if [bears’] natural food supply becomes relatively limited, they [will] seek for alternative food supplies. It brings them into conflict with humans by them coming into campsites,” said Professor Roger Baldwin of the UC Davis Department of Wildlife, Fish and Conservation Biology. As a precautionary measure, the park services have put GPS tracker collars on small population of the bears to provide information on bear activities and habits, as well as their movements. The collars are used to monitor specific bears that have shown unnatural behaviors due to their frequent interactions... ...

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Davis experiences water issues during California’s drought

At around 10 p.m. last Wednesday, Carmelo Lane experienced a water main leak due to erosion in old pipes. The leak caused street damage and required immediate attention from the Davis Police Department and the Public Works Department. The Public works department worked on fixing the leaks from 10:30 p.m. to 2:30 a.m. The City of Davis is no exception when it comes to California’s drought, making water problems a constant issue on the minds of both citizens and the city workers. “The Carmelo Lane break last week was the only one that is considered larger than normal, [it even] lifted the street up a little. Probably because of the time that it happened, people noticed it more. They’re not used to having construction in the middle of the night,” said Gary Wells, the public works water division manager. Carmelo Lane was one of the three reported breaks last week, causing some disturbances for the residents. The noise in the middle of the night was accompanied by low water pressure... ...

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Farmers Market at Sutter Davis Hospital now open year-round

Every Thursday from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., the Sutter Davis Hospital hosts an offshoot of the Davis Farmers Market at its main entrance. The partnership promotes health and supports the local community of growers and producers. The Davis Farmers Market has been a community establishment for 38 years. The market’s purpose is to connect people to their food and the farmers who grow it. The market makes fresh, local food available to nearby residents, hospital employees, patients and visitors. It is now open year-round. “I feel like the market does so much; it’s everything right. It’s good health, it’s people talking to each other, it’s being outside,” said Randii MacNear, manager of the Davis Farmers Market for the past 34 years. The market at Sutter, with only about eight vendors in the large, covered entry of the hospital, is considerably smaller than the downtown Davis markets. This is the first year in a five-year partnership that the market will be open year-round. “We’re really excited because it gives us... ...

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Davis Police Department Mine-Resistant Ambush Protected Vehicle voted to get sent back to U.S. government

On Oct. 21 the Davis City Council voted to send the Mine-Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) Vehicle that the Davis Police Department (DPD) acquired from military surplus back to the U.S. government. They also amended the city’s policy on acquiring military surplus equipment in the future. The two-part vote totaled 3-2 and 5-0, respectively. According to the DPD, the city has been participating in a program for the last 20 years in which military surplus equipment is turned over to city jurisdictions. Approximately five years ago the DPD proposed that they participate in the newest of these programs, titled the Department of Defense Excess Property Program (1033 Program), and they were approved. It was through this program that the DPD acquired the new MRAP. According to Lieutenant Thomas Waltz of the DPD, the MRAP was to replace an old one that the DPD had acquired many years before. Councilmember Robb Davis initiated the discussion of the fate of the MRAP at the end of August, proposing the two-part vote for sending... ...

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News In Brief: Beehive Design Collective to hold art show in Davis

On Friday, the Beehive Design Collective, a volunteer activist group dedicated to “cross-pollinating the grassroots,” will be showing their design pieces at Delta of Venus Cafe. The California-wide tour titled “Sucked Dry: Examining Drought and Privatization from Mesoamérica to California” aims to bring awareness to the current drought. According to the collective’s website, they hope their graphics will start a dialogue on the various issues the drought has created. The collective itself is based out of a town in rural Maine. As a volunteer organization the collective focuses on addressing local and global issues through a graphic medium. The event is free of charge and begins at 1:00 p.m. at Delta of Venus Cafe, 122 B St. — Gabriella Hamlett ...

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East Covell to receive road upgrade

On Oct.7 City Council approved a plan for the East Covell Corridor. The plan will help to improve traffic flow, increase safety for cyclists and pedestrians and adapt for the increase in population from The Cannery, the housing and business development currently under construction off of East Covell. Development of the East Covell Corridor Plan (ECCP) began in 2012, when The Cannery applications were submitted. In the final development agreement, The Cannery agreed to the funding of infrastructure accommodations that would have to be made for the influx of people moving into the area. “The Cannery development was the impetus for taking a look at the East Covell Corridor. We try to take into account what the trip generation is going to be like and how we can develop the infrastructure to accommodate all modes of transportation, but giving special attention to the vulnerable user, which [are] bicyclists and pedestrians,” said David Kemp, active transportation coordinator for the City of Davis. Before the plan was conceived, the City of Davis... ...

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Gov. Brown signs bill to prevent sexual assault, rape on college campuses

Governor Jerry Brown signed Senate Bill 967, nationally known as the Yes Means Yes bill, into action Sept. 28. The Yes Means Yes bill aims to provide support for victims of sexual abuse on college campuses by requiring institutions of higher education in California to define affirmative consent as a verbal “yes” rather than the absence of a verbal “no.” Additionally, the bill mandates that universities educate their student bodies on consent and sexual assault in order to prevent perpetrator ignorance. “Our sisters, our daughters, our nieces — every woman deserves the right to pursue the dream of higher education without being threatened by the nightmare of violence and sexual abuse,” Senator Kevin de Leon (D-Los Angeles), author of SB 967, said in a press release. Additionally, the bill provides multiple resources funded by the state which victims can utilize to aid in the legal processing of reporting, investigating and closing cases. “It takes a lot of strength to report in the first place, and having to deal with an... ...

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Legislation to provide Californians with sick days passes

Starting July 1, 2015, the Healthy Workplaces, Healthy Families Act of 2014 will ensure that all Californians employed for 30 days or more will receive paid sick days. Six and a half million workers in California are currently not allotted paid sick days. The bill entitles employees to one paid sick hour for every 30 hours worked from the commencement of their employment. This legislation aims to increase familial wellness, prevent the spread of illness in the workplace, lower healthcare costs, decrease employee turnover and help support a thriving middle class. “Employers benefit, workers benefit and ultimately, the California economy benefits,” said Sen. Ricardo Lara (D-Bell Gardens). The bill was signed into effect on Sept. 10 of this year, making California only the second state in the United States to require that employers provide paid sick leave, the first state being Connecticut in 2011. As reported by the Huffington Post, such ordinances are now coming to cities including New York, San Diego, Portland and Washington D.C. Paid sick leave benefits... ...

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Fifth annual Tour de Cluck Bicycle Coop Crawl huge success

The fifth annual Tour de Cluck Bicycle Coop Crawl took place on Saturday, May 24. This collaboration of Davis Farm to School, Yolo Farm to Fork and other sponsors and participating businesses bring a chicken-centered community activity to the City of Davis. The City of Davis is well-known for its flat ground that is suitable for biking, exemplified by the city symbol of an old-fashioned bike. Similarly, the land surrounding Davis are vast areas of farmland; UC Davis is referred to mainly as an “Ag school.” The two concepts of agriculture and biking come together in this Davis-oriented family event. “The event is a fundraiser to benefit the programs of Davis Farm to School and Yolo Farm to Fork, non-profit organizations supporting farm-fresh and local produce in school lunches, school gardens, elementary school farm visits and recycling and composting programs,” said Beth Harrison, executive director of Yolo Farm to Fork. This year, the proceeds from ticket purchases and sponsors benefited the Davis Farm to School and Yolo Farm to Fork... ...

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UC Regents plan to improve transferring process

University of California (UC) Regents published a report on May 15 addressing a plan to ease the transferring process from California community college students into the UC system. This report followed UC President Janet Napolitano’s November 2014 address to UC Regents regarding upcoming plans for the UC system. “The University [UC system] must reexamine how we interact with community college transfers,” Napolitano said. “Many California students begin their higher education journey at a community college, yet yearn for the opportunity to earn a four-year degree. We must continue to support the access and success of the diversity of the California community college population.” The report entitled “Preparing California for Its Future: Enhancing Community College Student Transfer to UC”examines current issues surrounding the process of transferring into a UC school and details proposals to enhance the situation. These solutions have been imagined via collaboration of students, faculty, staff, the California State University (CSU) system and California Community Colleges (CCC). “Transfer students who enroll at UC repeatedly demonstrate their ability to succeed,... ...

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Davis Nugget Markets aim to support local school garden programs

In the past two months, the Nugget Markets and Davis Farm to School and Yolo Farm to Fork have been awarding schools with ‘stellar garden programs’ across Yolo County. These organizations have been working to provide everything from workshops, grants for gardens in schools and supplies to supplement school-based garden learning. The Nugget Markets is a family-owned upscale supermarket chain operating within the greater Sacramento metropolitan area headquartered in Woodland, Calif. Davis Farm to School and Yolo Farm to Fork are both non-profit organizations aiming to create an educational and cultural environment in local schools that connect food choices with personal health, community, farms and the land. The schools, which received the awards in late April, were Holmes Junior High, Davis School for Independent Study and King High School in Davis, and Plainfield Elementary and Dingle Elementary in Woodland. The criteria for winning were that of demonstrating effective, innovative and creative educational experiences through the school garden program. The schools chosen were able to provide several practical learning activities involving... ...

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Voter’s guide to Measures O, P

On June 3, the City of Davis will be holding its General Municipal and Special Elections. Registered voters will be electing two seats for Davis City Council along with voting on two measures — Measure O and Measure P. Measure O Approving Measure O would mean re-authorizing and extending the current transactions and use tax — sales tax— as well as increasing the current sales tax by one percent. Approving this would extend the existing sales tax sunset from Dec. 31, 2016 to Dec. 31, 2020. As the current sales tax, the increased sales tax would be a general tax so all revenue would pool into the City’s general fund and could be used for any legal governmental purpose. With the current rates, the city’s total sales tax rate — including both state and local sales taxes– is eight percent. This measure would increase that number to 8.5 percent. If not approved, the original 2016 sunset clause would bring down the sales tax to 7.5 percent. For Measure O Several individuals... ...

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California Strawberry Commission sues UC Davis

The California Strawberry Commission (CSC) filed a lawsuit against UC Davis in fall 2013 with the belief that UC Davis has intentions of ending its strawberry breeding program. The strawberry breeding program is a program that has, for decades, researched and developed new varieties of strawberries. Because of its existence, California strawberry growers can buy their plants directly from the University rather than buying plants from private breeding programs, which have much higher royalty rates. According to Carolyn O’Donnell, the communications director for the CSC, concern for the continuation of the breeding program arose as the professors who work for the program, Douglas Shaw and Kirk Larson, approached retirement. “In 2012, they let us know that they were not going to continue renewing the contract we have with them on an annual basis for the breeding program, that would also terminate the royalty discount the strawberry growers were getting, and that they weren’t planning on continuing the program,” O’Donnell said. Following this news, the CSC filed a lawsuit in hopes... ...

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