Review Category : Features

Meet Your Representatives: Katherine Sherman and Lauren Ashe

Name: Katherine Sherman Major: Nutrition Position: ASUCD Senator Year: Second-year 1: What is one skill you wish you had cultivated when you were younger? I was the third child in my family so when I was younger, I would definitely try and follow my brothers. So I think [although] I eventually learned to become a leader, if I had started earlier that would have been a great advantage. By getting involved in things and not just following my brothers, I eventually did that once they moved to college. In high school I was able to do that on my own; If I had started even earlier, it would have been so much better. 2: If you could live anywhere, where would you move to best serve your career interests? I’m not too sure what I want to do with my career yet. So that’s kind of hard, but I’m from San Diego and I love it. So for right now I’m going to stick with San Diego. There’s a lot... ...

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Students experiment with legal hallucinogen salvia

Have you ever woken up in class and realized your professor wasn’t actually shooting flames out of his fingertips? Maybe that’s a little radical for a post-lunch day dream, but it would be a realistic hallucination if you’d smoked salvia before heading to lecture. Salvia, which is legal to purchase in the state of California for those over the age of 18, causes users to experience anything from extreme euphoria to full-blown hallucinations. The term “salvia” comes from the scientific name Salvia divinorum — Salvia as the genus and divinorum indicating the species. According to Mosen Aly, the owner of Smoke Hut, a smoke shop on Covell Boulevard, salvia itself is commonly referred to as sage, and is the only species of the plant type that is distributed for psychedelic use. “It was never meant to be smoked,” Aly said. “Salvia was legalized to be burned as incense, and the label on a package describes it as ‘a tool for self-exploration.’” Salvia use was recorded for the first time in... ...

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Meet Your Representatives: Jonathan Mitchell and Naftali Moed

Name: Jonathan Mitchell Major: Biological systems engineering Position: ASUCD senator Year: Fourth 1: What would you want to do for your dream date? I’ve actually thought about this. Here’s my dream date: a tandem bike ride to the Arboretum where we sit on a beach towel and have a picnic in the middle of the day. That’s my dream date. So, beach towel, Arboretum, picnic, dream date and tandem bike ride. One, because I’ve never been on a tandem bike ride and think it would be pretty romantic. It’s a little cliché, but I think it would be really fun. I could have said skydiving, but realistically, I’m never going to go skydiving on a first date. 2: If you could live anywhere, where would you move to best serve your career interests? Seoul, Korea because I’m interested in semiconductors, or Silicon Valley, California. I would prefer to live in Silicon Valley because it’s still close enough to home. And it’s also a booming tech industry and it’s California, which... ...

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A guide to study abroad

Thinking of studying abroad, but have no idea where to start? UC Davis offers a wide variety of study abroad options to serve a range of needs. When choosing a program, students have to consider length of stay, housing, language and internships offered, among other things. The nine students below have weighed in on their study abroad experiences and offer advice to potential travelers. Quarter Abroad: If you’re restricted by time or finances, you might go abroad for only a quarter. Naseem Rad, a fourth-year neurobiology, physiology and behavior major, spent a total of five months in Madrid, Spain during Fall Quarter of her third-year. Rad said she would have loved to stay for more than a quarter, but found it difficult to find science classes related to her major. Instead, she took Spanish language classes and was able to add a Spanish minor after her return to Davis. “It was a good experience in making a home for yourself,” Rad said. “I had neighborhoods that I knew really well,... ...

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Oil trains put City of Davis at risk of explosions

Davis resident Lynne Nittler, founder of the Yolano (Yolo/Solano) Climate Action Central, was shocked to discover an imminent threat running through the heart of town. Currently, hundreds of barrels of unrefined oil from North Dakota cross through Davis to reach their destination at  an oil refinery in Benicia. Due to the several safety and environmental hazards associated with this trek, local citizens like Lynne Nittler have voiced their opposition to this type of oil transport, which is also known as “crude by rail.” “This is not my favorite kind of topic I tell you. I would much rather be doing carbon footprint stuff, and I would much rather be gardening than to be consumed with oil trains … Yuck! Yuck! Yuck!” Nittler said. “But we found this issue and we couldn’t turn our backs on it.” Aftering following and researching the issue, Nittler discovered that the issue of oil trains is also affecting nearby cities like Benicia. After moving through Davis, the unrefined oil continues to Benicia, and currently, the... ...

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UC Davis Motorsports Club shoots for Nationals

For the first time since their 2007 installation, UC Davis’ Motorsports Club (DMC) is shooting to get a race car to the Sports Car Club of America (SCCA) Nationals. The club was founded with the intention of building a community at UC Davis around automobile and motorsport interests, and hopes to make known the opportunities that various autocross events present. Autocross is a type of motorsport where drivers attempt to maneuver their car through a structured course in a timed competition. Nationals, which is the biggest motorsport event in the U.S., is run by the SCCA, and racers must compete in local, district and divisional competition events. After participating in a certain amount of races, the competitor can then qualify for nationals. This year, DMC is attempting to raise enough money in order to race a car of their own. DMC’s president, fourth-year genetics major Lori Rothmuller has been involved in autocross since she was 16. “I do race cars. I think it’s awesome!” Rothmuller said. “Part of our project... ...

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Students struggle to make ends meet

Editor’s note: Elizabeth has requested The Aggie to withhold her last name. Two students sit in the same lecture. One is worried about his upcoming fraternity event, the other about where her next meal will come from. Elizabeth, a fourth-year psychology major, recalled instances in which she had gone without food for a couple of days, and how heavily it impacted her school performance. Students typically come to college to create a better future for themselves through education; however, while some students have the ability to work or come from families that are able and willing to support them, other students risk hunger just to make ends meet. Elizabeth is a veteran transfer student who will be graduating this year, but she is also a single mom with two kids, ages six and eight. She commutes every day to UC Davis from Woodland while her kids are at school, and said she has gone hungry to feed them in times of extreme trouble. “When I first transferred, my benefits, financial... ...

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Meet your representatives: Kriti Garg and Shehzad Lokhandwalla

Name: Kriti Garg Major: Double major in community and regional development and international relations Position: Ethnic and Cultural Affairs Commission Chair Year: Third year 1. What did you want to be when you were a child? I wanted to be a teacher for forever. For the longest time, I also wanted to be a National Geographic Magazine photographer because I wanted to travel and I like to take photos and I didn’t want to have to write. And for a while I wanted to write children’s books and illustrate them. I also wanted to be a journalist at one point. Overall, the theme of everything that I’ve ever wanted to do growing up has been telling people stories. 2. What is one of the biggest lessons you’ve learned throughout your life? One of the many big things that I’ve learned is that everyone has a story and everyone’s own story is being written. It shapes the way that they think and the way that they interact with the world. 3.... ...

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Vagina: OurStories to discuss gendered violence in UC Davis community

With bold voices on a stage, Vagina: OurStories will unveil personal narratives about the gendered violence experiences of UC Davis students. Sponsored by the Women’s Resources and Research Center (WRRC) and inspired by Eve Ensler’s famous 1996 play The Vagina Monologues, this year’s event will be the third incarnation of the play to raise awareness of gender issues in the Davis community, and raise funds to benefit local organizations against gendered violence. It will take place from March 1 to March 2 at the Davis Veterans Memorial Theatre. “It’s important to talk about how gender violence isn’t just something you see on the news, it’s happening in Davis, and to the people around you and even closest to you,” said Lamia Hajani, producer of Vagina: OurStories, second-year political science and women and gender studies double major. “In places like Davis, we have a tendency to un-localize things and make them outside of us, but the point of V-Stories is to bring that uncomfortability in and make us realize that these... ...

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Dining commons hold vegetarian cooking competition

On Feb. 24, the UC Davis Dining Commons hosted the Green Chef Challenge. Teams of students, each representing one of the three dining commons — Cuarto, Segundo and Tercero — competed to craft a vegetarian dish using produce from the Student Farm. At 6 p.m., the secret ingredient was revealed: fennel. The teams had an hour and a half to craft their dish before they were whisked away to Segundo for judgment. On March18, the winning dish will be featured as an entrée in the dining commons. “I’m really competitive,” said Amanda Nieh, a fourth-year clinical nutrition major. “As soon as I heard ‘cooking competition,’ I knew I wanted to do this.” Nieh, a contestant on Segundo’s team, said she has plenty of experience cooking — she also holds a job as a teaching kitchen assistant at the Student Wellness Center. Nieh said she saw an advertisement for the event during one of her visits to the dining commons. “They said you don’t have to be a chef, you can... ...

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UC Davis beer brewing documentary wins award in Hollywood

This year’s winner of the TASTE award for Best Mini-Film or Documentary is “The Art and Science of Beer” starring UC Davis’ own, Professor Charles Bamforth. Bamforth said the award winning film was one of two short documentaries on beer brewing at UC Davis, both commissioned by the University of California Office of the President. “The Office of the President was commissioning some films to illustrate what goes on in the University of California as a whole. They selected two topics from Davis and we were one of them,” Bamforth said. He also said that he was not able to attend the awards ceremony in Hollywood because he was busy teaching, which he mentioned was his favorite aspect of his career. “It never gets old, there’s always a new angle on it,” Bamforth said. “There’s always the joy of seeing the smile on people’s faces as they get it, and the realization that some of these people are going to go on and be successful brewers.” Bamforth is a professor... ...

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Elements of ecological research come together at Giedt Hall

Ranked as one of the best ecology graduate programs in the world, the UC Davis Graduate Group in Ecology (GGE) showcased their scientific research at the seventh annual Graduate Student Symposium in Ecology on Feb. 15. The symposium was funded by the Graduate Student Association, the Coastal Marine Sciences Institute and the Graduate Group in Ecology, and close to 100 undergraduates, graduate students and faculty members attended. They gathered at Giedt Hall to tune in on topics ranging from marine ecology to population biology presented by 11 UC Davis graduate students in GGE. “One of our main goals is to ignite collaborations that don’t exist yet,” Katie Eskra, an ecology graduate student and a primary organizer of the event, said. “There are people studying ecology from different graduate groups and this is a way to collaborate together.” The GGE includes students studying a wide range of topics, from forestry and atmospheric sciences to hydrology and entomology. To advance future discussion, Eskra encouraged attendees to share their experiences in the field... ...

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Campus organizations hold Idea Fair

Last summer, Mike Eidlin, a fourth-year Japanese and economics double major, had an idea for an iPhone app. He presented his idea to the Hacker Lab competition in Sacramento, where he recruited a team to build the app and won third place in their hackathon. Currently, the UC Davis Computer Science Club is running a similar event: the Idea Fair. The event is co-hosted by on-campus organizations: The Institute of Electrical Engineers, the Engineering and Technology Entrepreneurship Club and Pixel, the graphic design club. The Idea Fair consists of three separate events: Pitch Week, the Idea Mixer and the Idea Hack. During Pitch Week, students presented their ideas to computer science officers for consultation. Then, the Idea Mixer allowed these students to present their ideas to other students, in the hopes of recruiting them to their team. “The goal is to facilitate collaboration, make ideas happen and even make them come true,” said Charlyn Gonda, a fourth-year computer science major and president of the Computer Science Club. Finally, from Feb.... ...

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Traveling preacher moves onto Memorial Union courtyard

If you’ve been to the Memorial Union (MU) lately, you may have noticed that Monte is back. He stands in the courtyard reading from a small Bible, while his dog, Sarah, lies next to him. Monte has been preaching across the country since the early ’80s, hoping to plant religious ideas in people’s minds.   “I’m here to plant seeds when no one else is,” Monte said. While most people peacefully pass by him on their way through the MU, Enhao Cheung, a fourth-year pharmaceutical chemistry major who has tabled with the Muslim Student Association (MSA), said that there have been a few unsavory encounters. “Even though he is exercising his First Amendment right, it’s not right to use the F-word. I see some people who are very rude to the gentleman. One time I saw someone put up the middle finger at that guy’s face,” Cheung said. According to Cheung, some people might feel compelled to react negatively to Monte because they are turned off by his overzealous approach.... ...

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Asian American Association gets ready for 10th Anniversary Film Festival

Emily Nguyen, a fourth-year economics major, is the co-director for the Asian American Association (AAA) Film Festival, and in her film festival folder she has images of buttons featuring statements that directly deny popular Asian American stereotypes. The buttons read: “I don’t get red when I drink,” “I am not your translator,” “My eyes are open,” “I’m not a science major,” “I’m well endowed” and “I was born here.” The AAA Film Festival is an event held for two weeks in May every year at UC Davis. Wesley Kan, a second-year neurobiology, physiology and behavior major and the publicity coordinator for the festival, said that each year the group comes up with a general theme and finds movies that follow that theme in ways that relate to the Asian American community. “It’s a way for people who don’t really know much about Asian Americans to see different sides. You know there’s all these stereotypes about Asian Americans, so this film festival is a way to show that they’re [not true],”... ...

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