Review Category : Features

UC Davis students plan mission to Mars

A popular inspirational phrase suggests people “shoot for the moon,” but that’s not far enough for Eclipse Rocketry. This interdisciplinary group of UC Davis students has taken on the challenge of making possible a manned mission to Mars. Ben Holmquist, a fourth-year mechanical and aerospace engineering major, captains a team of over 20 members of various majors and ages, all with at least one thing in common: their interest in space and rocketry. This interest has inspired each of the members to come together in pursuit of designing a mission plan to send human beings on a trip around Mars for the first time. Holmquist said that this is part of an international competition put on by a foundation called Inspiration Mars. “They’re one of the few private foundations that is trying to raise funding and create a mission design for a private manned mission to Mars,” Holmquist said. The foundation’s goal is to raise money and design a plan to send a pair of humans to fly by Mars... ...

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Corporate alumni offer students networking opportunity

On Feb. 6, students will have the opportunity to personally meet and network with five corporate professionals. From 8 to 10 p.m., the Finance & Investment Club (FIC) will be holding their sixth-annual Career Panel in 1003 Giedt. “This is a great place to meet very powerful people,” said Mike Eidlin, a fourth-year economics and Japanese double-major who attended the panel last year. “This is your chance as a Davis student to put your foot in the door.” Eidlin said these business professionals typically only pay attention to target schools — the renowned business schools like Harvard, Princeton, Yale and others. Although UC Davis’ Graduate School of Management rapidly rose last year in Forbes’ ranking of MBA schools, they largely cater to only graduate students. “There’s not that much help around the campus for business students,” said Andy Feldman, president of FIC and a double-major in economics and communication. At only six years old, FIC is the oldest business club on campus. Fourth-year managerial economics major Jimmy McCutcheon, vice president,... ...

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Rise Up! Campaign raises money for Typhoon Haiyan relief

In response to the recent Typhoon Haiyan, Filipino organizations across campus have come together to kick off the Rise Up! Campaign. Only three months ago, the deadliest typhoon in the history of the Philippines took over 6,000 lives, according to the nation’s government. Approximately 11 million people have been affected by the catastrophe, and the country is still recovering from the extreme impact. During the weekend following the typhoon, multiple students at UC Davis, including fifth-year history major Kirby Araullo, were quick to extend their hands in support. After reaching out to Filipino organizations and clubs on campus, Araullo attended a meeting with all of the presidents of the seven main Fil-Am (Filipino-American) community groups. During the meeting, Angelica Singson, Kirby Araullo and Robyn Huey were designated to be the main coordinators of the Rise Up! relief efforts for Typhoon Haiyan. “I have worked with relief efforts before at my junior college back in 2009 when another typhoon happened,” Araullo said. Shortly before Typhoon Haiyan hit the Philippines, the 7.2... ...

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Students drive to college degrees

Fourth-year English major Seychelle Steiner said she listens to trashy radio shows more than her fellow students might. Steiner, like many Aggies, doesn’t actually live in the college town of Davis itself. Since her second year in college, Steiner has been commuting daily to classes from her home in Sacramento. “I have an 8 a.m. discussion, so I wake up at 5:30 in order to get everything ready, get breakfast and leave at 6:45 in the morning,” Steiner said. “ Yes, I’m on campus really early, but I do that in case there is traffic or an accident.” Since much of Davis is occupied by college students, many community members are not aware of the large student population that does not live locally. “To me, Sacramento is so close, so it’s not that big of a deal,” Steiner said. “I don’t think there should be any judgment against commuting, it’s more curiosity than animosity. I think people are curious about how it works.” Students may live outside of Davis for... ...

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UC Davis computer science lecturer moonlights as Fringe Festival blogger

UC Davis continuing lecturer Sean Davis watches 160 to 200 plays every August. For the rest of the year, he teaches computer science. “I think I am lucky enough to be gifted with a wide range of interests,” Davis said. “I’m a general contractor, I review plays and I teach computer science.” Like many undergraduate students on campus today, Davis started in the 1970s with no specific major interests. After bouncing from chemical engineering to history, Davis graduated with a Bachelor of Arts psychology degree in 1978, having zero idea that one day he would rejoin the Aggie community as a faculty member in the College of Engineering. “It’s kind of cool because you realize that he absolutely didn’t know what he wanted to do at our age,” said second-year animal biology and computer science double major Russell Miller, who took Engineering Computer Science (ECS) 30: Programming and Problem Solving and ECS 50: Machine Dependent Programming with Davis. “He had a very generalized education, and learned most of the computer... ...

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Student veteran presence grows on campus

Over 700 students make up the veteran population on campus. The Davis Student Veteran Organization (DSVO), founded in 2010, serves as their representing body. Student veteran organizations have developed on campus over the past few years with goals to build community, representation and awareness concerning veteran identity. Lack of veteran-specific resources and breaking pervasive stereotypes have been struggles to their efforts. Though experiences vary, Elias Sanchez, a fourth-year political science and international relations double major and president of DSVO, said that veterans face many obstacles readapting to civilian life. “Reintegrating into civilization is really hard felt because you have sacrificed so much physically, psychologically, emotionally,” Sanchez said. “The greatest fear I have for veterans is when you have free time that’s the time you have to reflect … The difficulties we have had were never addressed. In the military your emotional needs are not priority one, your mission is priority one. But when you come to a normal setting and people actually ask you, ‘What do you think?’ or ‘How... ...

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Meet Your Representatives: Victoria Tam and Gareth Smythe

Name: Victoria Tam Major: Undeclared social sciences Position: Commissioner for the Ethnic and Cultural Affairs Committee Year: Second year What career do you hope to pursue after your education? How will ASUCD help you in your future plans? I came to Davis thinking I’d be a lawyer, and I discovered that I’d rather be helping younger students who need a little more push and encouragement, so I want to go into teaching — probably middle school or high school. ASUCD is definitely a busy organization, and being in ECAC which is a part of ASUCD is really helping me learn how to interact with people. You’re always busy planning something with other people, or listening to others give presentations about their legislation. It’s great for social skills — people skills. What’s your favorite drink at the CoHo and why do you like that drink in particular? Ahh! I get the drink that they have every month. They get me every time! I feel like people mostly buy them because they’re... ...

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Before they were professors, they were us

Professor Ashutosh Bhagwat UC Davis law professor worked as Justice Anthony Kennedy’s clerk When Professor Ashutosh Bhagwat of UC Davis’ School of Law was 26 years old, he was one of the 36 clerks for the United States Supreme Court Justices. Today, he teaches constitutional and administrative law, subjects that had great importance during his clerkship. “I’m really interested in politics and policy,” Bhagwat said. Bhagwat completed his undergraduate education at Yale, where he majored in history.  Following this, he moved to the University of Chicago’s Law School, where he graduated in 1990. The Federal Reserve was his next move, where he worked as a research assistant.  From there, he moved back to Chicago for a clerkship position with Richard Posner, a justice on the Seventh Circuit Appellate Court. Posner is widely regarded as one of the fathers of law and economics, according to Bhagwat, and with him, Bhagwat gained experience for his next job. At the Supreme Court, Bhagwat spent a year clerking for Justice Anthony M. Kennedy, who... ...

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Campus jobs provide students with work experience, friends

Programs and services that define the student experience are all partly run by employees who are students themselves. Jobs like this can be found on Aggie Job Link, a website that helps provide resources like job search tools, resume assistance, internship opportunities and professional networking. Though many students work for financial supplementation, others may also apply for work experience, resume building or even to meet people and make friends. Britney Larriva, a second-year human development and Spanish major who works in the Activities and Recreation Center (ARC), was introduced to her job through Aggie Job Link. “Having an on-campus job is really nice. It’s a good opportunity, it’s great that they make it available and flexible for students,” Larriva said. While working on-campus may seem convenient for students as employers are aware of holidays and finals week, Rachel Vogel, a second-year nutrition science major and an administrative assistant at the Study Abroad office, said that her job has still significantly impacted her academic habits. “I actually find that having a... ...

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UC Davis Study Abroad offers summer health internships

If you’re one of the thousands of pre-med undergraduates at UC Davis and you’re seeking those seemingly elusive internships and experiences, the UC Davis Study Abroad office has a solution for you. But you’ll be on the waiting list. This summer, for the first time, the study abroad office will be offering students summer health internships in four different places around the world: Bolivia, South Africa and two different locations in India. “I was drawn in by the traveling element and the internship; it was a good integration of all of my different interests,” said Kathleen Maher, a fourth-year anthropology major. “[The faculty and students] had such energy and there was such clear excitement about the program.” These programs will last for four weeks, and will run from July to August. Between the four programs, there is space for approximately 40 students, and demand is high. The enrollment for the four programs opened on Wednesday Jan. 8, and all spots have already been filled, though spots on the waitlists are... ...

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Meet your representatives: Janesh Gupta and Dana Sever

Janesh Gupta ASUCD Senator Major: computer science Second-year 1. What are you best at cooking? I’m pretty good at making boiled eggs. I’m really bad in the kitchen overall, but I like boiled eggs a lot, and mac and cheese. I think I’ve perfected mac and cheese. 2. If you could make a magic potion to do anything, what would it do? A magic potion for me to wake up in the morning at 8 a.m. because I’ve needed that these last couple of quarters. That’s probably it, to find the energy to wake up for 8 a.m.’s on this campus. 3. What movie would you like your life to resemble? I wish it was like a Finding Forrester type of thing, where I don’t have everything figured out and then someone helps me get there, and I become their benefactor, kind of. 4. What’s your favorite quote? I really like this quote that someone said at senate last week. Dr. Schubert from the Experimental College was presenting on why... ...

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Davis finds knack for novelty

Often associated with bikes, big red buses and cows, Davis was once claimed to be America’s Weirdest City in the satirical Weekly World News. The town is home to peculiar urban legends, like historic potholes and Ted the Titan, and distinctive sites like the famous toad tunnel and Baggins End. The concept of a toad tunnel first sprang about when the city was in the process of building an overpass by Pole Line Road in 1994. “Helping the toads to find a happy little habitat was the intention,” said John McNerney, the wildlife resource specialist of the City of Davis. “The main idea is that they would encounter earthen berm.” Community members such as Julie Partansky, who later became the mayor of Davis, were concerned that toads would be inevitably mashed in the process of their hippity-hopping across the overpass. After much deliberation, Partanksy convinced the Davis City Council to build an approximately 220-foot long corridor tunnel with an 18-inch diameter of corrugated steel pipe. According to McNerney, the core... ...

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An Islamic State of Mind comes to UC Davis

Over 1,000 people from all parts of the West Coast joined the UC Davis Muslim Student Association (MSA) on campus from Jan. 17 to 19 for the 16th annual MSA West Conference. Chancellor Linda P.B. Katehi attended the conference opening ceremonies the evening of Jan. 17, welcoming students with a speech celebrating the University’s diversity. “First of all, I think this conference provides a very safe environment for students to have a dialogue about important issues,” Katehi said. “Sometimes the issues are very difficult to discuss, but I believe these are the right ways and right environments where difficult discussions can take place and where people, through respect for each other, can develop trust for each other and can have safe dialogues that eventually can lead into some important solutions.” The MSA on campus was founded by students in the 1970s, but was officially recognized by ASUCD in the ’90s. “Our main goal is to have a safe haven for Muslim students on campus, and for community members to learn... ...

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Long tradition of strikes, protests characterizes UC Davis

Historically, campus protests have received some form of support from the University, community or police, and as the University of California’s culture continues to host strikes and movements, this UC Davis tradition has as well. On Nov. 20, 2013, AFSCME 3299, the union for UC service and patient care workers, held a strike disputing unfair labor practices. The strike involved several types of UC workers and students, and one student recalled how her professor held class off campus to show support. “We went to The Graduate and moved two benches together,” said Falon Darville, a fourth-year English major. “Then we had our usual class discussion.” Perhaps the most active times for strikes and protests, according to Dr. Jerry Drawhorn of CSU Sacramento, were during the Vietnam War era, when several issues like race, homosexuality and anti-war efforts were swirling together. For a book he is currently writing, Drawhorn is creating a timeline of UC Davis’ radio station, KDVS, where he once DJ’ed. His research has catalogued the dates of several... ...

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Are you BEST, SMART, NOW or independent?

Six ASUCD senators are elected each fall, and six more, the president and vice president every winter. Candidates can choose to run on slates, comparable to United States political parties, and if elected, serve a year-long term. The Fall 2013 ASUCD Senate election season saw two independent candidates elected, along with three from the NOW slate and one from SMART. The established slates on the UC Davis campus, NOW, BEST and SMART, each have specific goals, and their senators often vote accordingly. Current ASUCD Senator, Miles Thomas, a fifth-year managerial economics major and co-founder of BEST, said that BEST is the only slate that doesn’t require a senator’s vote on specific issues. “NOW wants you to vote against divestment from companies profiting off of the Israeli occupation of Palestine,” Thomas said in an email. “SMART wants you to primarily represent underrepresented communities.” For example, SMART’s newly elected senator Mariah Kala Watson is interested in re-investing in the Food Pantry, according to her personal statement. Yee Xiong, a fourth-year Asian American... ...

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