Men’s Soccer Preview

Teams: UC Davis (8-5-4, 6-2) vs. Sacramento State (7-5-2, 4-1-1) Where: Aggie Soccer Field — Davis, CA When: Sunday at 3 p.m. Who to watch: Sophomore forward Matt Sheldon ought to be on fire this Sunday after a magnificent performance against UC Santa Barbara this past weekend. Sheldon tied the score against the Gauchos with three seconds left in the first half and sealed the victory for the Aggies midway through the first overtime. Thanks to Sheldon’s outstanding plays, the Aggies were able to extend their winning streak to three and solidify their top spot in the Big West Conference. Recognized for his efforts, Sheldon picked up his second career Big West Conference Offensive Player of the Week title. The aforementioned goals against UCSB were his first of the season and could not have occurred at a more opportune time for the team. It was UC Davis’ first win at Harder Stadium since 2008 and marked the first time in program history the Aggies swept the Gauchos in regular season... ...

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Editorial: California Aggie style

The incredibly active Facebook page UC Davis Confessions seems like it’s updated every few minutes with a new anonymous “confession” from a UC Davis student. We’re inspired. That page garnered over 2,000 likes in just a few weeks, so in an effort to make our own California Aggie page more likable, here are some of our own confessions: We’re kind of gross. And by gross, we mean our-office-floors-just-got-cleaned-for-the-first-time-since-the-1970s kind of gross. There’s a sign on the refrigerator that says we clean it every Friday, but that is not the case. There’s still a gingerbread house sitting in the freezer from nearly four years ago, and it’s too late to throw it out now. We’re emotionally attached. We also have a bagel that’s been hanging from the ceiling for as long as anyone can remember. The fact that it’s not even moldy still frightens us. Our office is nearly as old as those in “Mad Men,” but nowhere near as stylish. We have borderline antique Danish designer furniture in our newsroom.... ...

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Editorial: Welcome to the basement

Last Friday, the Unit Relocation and Space Allocation Committee announced that Entertainment Council (EC) would be moving to the basement of Lower Freeborn. Creative Media will be taking over EC’s current office. The editorial board would like to formally welcome our new neighbors. Welcome to the dungeon. We’ve got fun and games. While we already have two neighboring ASUCD media units — KDVS and AggieTV — we are excited to welcome a new member to our exclusive club. We know the idea of moving to the basement is scary. It’s dark. Isolated. Lonely. BUT. There are pros to working (living) in the basement. You will never get skin cancer. There is no sunlight in the basement, and while you may start to look like a vampire, skin damage is nearly impossible. Another pro: free concerts. You know how bands do sound checks before they go on stage? Guess what this basement is located under. That’s right. Freeborn Hall. Where big name artists like Snoop Dogg, CAKE and Steve Aoki have... ...

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Campus Chic

Jenn Im, fourth-year communication major The Aggie: What are you wearing? Im: “I’m wearing a thrifted jean jacket, a thrifted top with a bunch of cats on it, a circle skirt from Forever 21, Shoe Mint boots and that’s it!” How did you decide what to wear today? “I didn’t want to wear pants today. When I’m in a rush, I go for skirts. I felt like browns and blues today. And I just threw my hair up since it was out of control!” Where do you find inspiration? “Inspiration comes from the environment, my mood of that day, everywhere.” What pieces are you looking forward to wearing during the colder months? “Definitely coats and layering sweaters. Oh, and beanies of course.” STEPHANIE B. NGUYEN can be reached at campus@theaggie.org. ...

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UC Davis sends delegation to Student of Color Conference

Last year, UC Davis hosted the Student of Color Conference (SOCC) The year, an expected 120-student delegation  from UC Davis is being sent to UC Riverside, where the 2012 conference event is taking place Nov. 9 to 11. SOCC is an annual event put on by the University of California Student Association (UCSA) in which students of color and allies can participate in workshops, open forums and lectures about the various issues which people of color face. SOCC is UCSA’s largest and longest-running conference, and takes place at a different UC campus each year over the course of three days. The main objective of SOCC is to promote a sense of leadership in participants in hopes of creating a community of people who want to encourage progression of students of color in the future. This year’s theme is “R’Stories: Embracing our Struggles as Tools for Transformation.” The theme focuses on the idea that all students have their own identities and that they must acknowledge the struggle that people of past... ...

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Tahoe’s petite pest

People call pest-removal companies every day to rid their homes and yards of small creatures that have become a nuisance. Gophers tear up manicured lawns and cockroaches skitter along floors spreading germs. Most people are unaware that Emerald Bay at Lake Tahoe has a similar but much larger problem. Corbicula fluminea, more commonly known as the Asiatic clam, appeared in Lake Tahoe around 2002. While small, these aquatic mollusks can self-fertilize and release 2,000 juveniles per day, amounting to over 100,000 in a lifetime. Their numbers increased exponentially in Emerald Bay and now these tiny clams are a big problem. “Typically, when a non-native species is introduced, the native species begin to die… When the clams appeared, they basically overtook the native [Tahoe] species,” said Geoffrey Schladow, director of the UC Davis Tahoe Environmental Research Center. The repercussions of introducing a non-native species on an established food web of an ecosystem can be significant. Historically, many species have become endangered this way. In addition to the effect on the native... ...

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Ask Doc Joe and Katy Ann

Doc Joe is a psychologist and attorney who has consulted with and advised people of all ages. Katy Ann is a licensed marriage and family therapist, who, like Doc Joe, has counseled and advised people of all ages. The discussion and advice offered in their column is not offered as a clinical recommendation or as a substitute for clinical treatment. Rather, Doc Joe’s and Katy Ann’s comments are intended to stimulate thought, often with a sense of humor. Sometimes they agree; sometimes they don’t. So, read on… Dear Doc Joe and Katy Ann, I am willing to admit that I don’t understand women very well. I’ve been with Penny for two years, and I still don’t know what to say when she’s upset. So last night she came home from work, and started crying. She came over to the couch, sat down next to me, and began telling me about her conflict with a co-worker, “Paula.” Well, she began by telling me what time she got to work, how Paula... ...

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Column: Porn 101

In my anthropology class, I sit directly behind someone who, instead of taking notes on the dental structure of primates, watches porn. As the amount of students sitting behind him grows, so does my curiosity about porn. Does it hold any serious value? Pornography has always carried the social stigma of “appealing to baser needs.” The Kama Sutra was banned in the United Kingdom during the nineteenth century. Erotic literature is important as it increases both sexual knowledge and confidence. Although the Kama Sutra is the favorite of many bibliophiles and sexual beings today, it is still considered to be a slightly taboo text in contemporary America — quite impressive for an almost two-thousand year old book. Today’s erotic images are similar to those uncovered in the ruins of well-preserved Pompeii. The first century city was similar to our modern day Vegas, except what happened in Pompeii truly stayed in Pompeii. The images painted on bathhouse walls of nude people engaged in sexual acts were designed not only to excite... ...

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Students mixed up in scam posted on Aggie Job Link

Sarah’s boss requested that she send $1,770 of her own money to a business partner in early October. Sarah did. Her boss provided a money order of $1,870 — $100 for Sarah to keep. Ten days later, Sarah learned that the money was fraudulent. Sarah, a junior transfer student whose real name will be kept confidential for privacy reasons, was a victim of a job scam from the beginning: a well-described job post on Aggie Job Link (AJL). After searching for “in Davis” and “paid position” on AJL, Sarah applied for an office assistant job, which appeared in the top five results. After emailing her cover letter, resume and references to the job poster’s personal email address, she got the job in August before moving to Davis for the school year. “I saw the job on Aggie Job Link, and it paid $150 a week for me to do the basic office things. [The boss] said she was in Sweden and [that] she was an international consultant,” she said. “She... ...

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Column: Enough shit

My heart is beating frantically. Sweat beads profusely on my brow. There’s an ominous feeling in the pit of my stomach. My asshole puckers to stay shut. I rush through a door and make a mad dash to the nearest rectangular stall. Once inside I pause and inhale a long draught of respite. I’m stopped mid-breath by the ghastly spectacle before me. My eyes widen in an odd combination of sheer terror and amazement. Like two koi fish in a lily pond, I see two extremely large shits floating languidly in the toilet bowl. The piss in the bowl is on the brink of overflowing. It’s the kind of color that can’t be achieved by a single person’s urine, oh no. I know what you were expecting. You were expecting a fistful of spine-tingling Halloween-related horror stories. Alas, I am unfortunately a fucking pussy and am deathly afraid of anything even vaguely tangential to ghosts, demons, poltergeists, leprechauns, squids, flying saucers — you get the idea. But who said I... ...

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News in Brief: Tour the City of Davis Wetlands

On Saturday the public is invited to attend a free guided tour of the City of Davis Wetlands from 3 to 5 p.m. Guides from the Yolo Basin Foundation will be on hand to teach the importance of the habitat as well as its importance to seasonal and resident diving ducks. November is when diving ducks such as Buffleheads, Common Goldeneyes and Ruddy Ducks are seen diving underwater to feed. People planning to go on the tour should meet at the gate in front of the City of Davis’ wastewater treatment plant, east of the Yolo County landfill on Road 28H, a few minutes before 3 p.m. It’s recommended that people bring binoculars, water and a field guide. Most of the tour will be by car, with a few optional short walks. Tours will occur rain or shine. -Claire Tan ...

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Column: Universe: The Musical

Human beings, vegetables or cosmic dust — we all dance to a mysterious tune, intoned in the distance by an invisible piper. — Albert Einstein Einstein had an ability, rare among physicists, to convey the hardcore science he was so passionate about in a poetic way that struck a chord with anyone who listened. Similarly, Mozart had an ability, also rare among composers, to create a musical work of mathematical perfection that wooed physicists and poets alike. Perhaps there is a relationship between the numbers and the notes. We could call the relationship the wave structure of matter, resonant frequencies or Pythagorean scales, and we would be technically correct. But we can also do what Einstein and Mozart did — look past the divergence of music and math, and call the relationship what it is: a universal, cosmic harmony. If the modern ideas of string theory are to be believed, then anything and everything is comprised of vibrating parts. Atoms, quarks, photons, alternate dimensions, piano strings and the air from a... ...

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Doubling down on genetic change

In many ways, biological evolution at the molecular scale is a series of small steps. But scientists have not agreed on exactly how those steps add up to create entirely new genes, the molecular sequences on DNA that code for an organism’s vital functions. By conducting controlled evolution on a strain of Salmonella bacteria, a team of researchers from UC Davis and the University of Uppsala in Sweden have shown for the first time how this process can occur when existing genes are duplicated and subsequently diverge into two separate genes — the original and the new variant. The results were published in the Oct. 19 issue of Science. “It seems pretty clear that genes duplicate, that new genes evolve, and that they evolve by duplication of old genes, and then divergence of the two copies,” said John Roth, a UC Davis microbiology professor and co-author of the study. “People have suggested that this problem of duplication and divergence is simple, but it actually raises serious problems.” Unlike evolutionary events... ...

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Robert Mondavi Institute debuts Honey and Pollination Center

This past Saturday, entomologists and honey enthusiasts alike came together to celebrate the debut of the Robert Mondavi Institute’s (RMI) Honey and Pollination Center at the “Bounty of Pollination: More Than Just Honey” event. Saturday’s event featured guest speakers, including award-winning cinematographer Louie Schwartzberg who directed and produced The Beauty of Pollination, as well as various demonstrations from the Davis Co-Op and Whole Foods. In addition, guests enjoyed honey tastings. The independent center was approved earlier this year by the College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences (CAES) and aims to promote the use of high-quality honey in the market, to help ensure the sustainability of honey production and to showcase the importance of honey and pollination in California. The center is funded primarily through donations and grants, with initial seed funding from Whole Foods, CAES, the Department of Entomology, the Office of Research and Z Specialty Food in Woodland. The center differs from the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility in the Department of Entomology, which is a... ...

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Ride to Know group bikes from SF to Sac for Prop. 37

This past weekend, a group of Bay Area cyclists embarked on a two-day ride called The Ride to Know from San Francisco to Sacramento in support of Proposition 37. Prop. 37, the California voter initiative to require labeling of genetically-modified (GM) foods, has been a debated item on the Nov. 6 ballot. The cyclists included members of the Biosafety Alliance, California Right to Know, Sustainable Living Roadshow and various other people who support Prop. 37. “During The Right to Know March on Oct. 3 in San Francisco, I asked attendees if they would ride their bikes to Sacramento in support of Prop. 37; there was a lot of interest and we decided to do it,” said Miguel Robles, a member of the Biosafety Alliance, and one of the ride’s organizers. Riders started their journey on Saturday from the Ferry Building in San Francisco. They took a ferry to Vallejo and began cycling from there. The riders met people along the way and stayed overnight in Davis, hosted by a group... ...

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