Review Category : Front page story

ASUCD Fall 2014 Senate Election Results

On Nov. 21 at 4 p.m, ASUCD Elections Committee Chair, John Wu, announced the results of the ASUCD Fall 2014 Senate Elections. The winners are as follows, in order of highest voter turnout: Alex Lee, Casey Nguyen, Reem Fatayerji, Roman Rivilis, Anabiah Syed and Andrea Velazquez. “I don’t know how I feel yet, it’s going to be a really long year,” said fourth-year political science and economics double major and senate-elect Roman Rivilis. “ We have a lot on our table and a lot of obstacles we need to overcome, especially with the coming tuition hikes and the climate of student activism that we need to foster in ASUCD.” 2,896 voters turned out for this quarter’s elections. This was significantly lower than the Winter 2014 Senate Elections, whose voter turnout was 27.11 percent — the second highest in recorded ASUCD history. “I do have to say that I am disappointed in the voter turnout,” said current ASUCD Senator Gareth Smythe. “ASUCD controls a lot of resources. This is one of... ...

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Film Review: The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1

Perhaps Mockingjay Part 1’s greatest flaw lies right in the name itself. The film is part tragedy, part romance and part incomplete. The film adapts the first half of the final installment in Suzanne Collins’ young adult series, The Hunger Games, which depicts the fictional country of Panem, a dystopian world where resources are scarce and children are forced to kill each other in annual televised death matches. The film follows a similar trend adopted by other franchises, including Harry Potter and Twilight, in splitting the last book into two consecutive films. However, like Mockingjay, these books are already entire tales within themselves. Mockingjay Part 1 comes across overall as uneventful and lacking in excitement, and serves as a prime example on how final books are not meant to be two tales in one, but one complete story. Mockingjay Part 1 begins shortly after Katniss Everdeen (Jennifer Lawrence), former Hunger Games winner and face of a burgeoning rebellion against the Capitol, escapes from her second time in the games. After... ...

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UC Regents approve tuition hike

The University of California (UC) Board of Regents approved a tuition plan Thursday morning that will increase UC tuition by up to five percent annually over the next five years. The decision came at the Board of Regents meeting held at the UCSF Mission Bay Campus, where hundreds of students protested. UC tuition is currently $12,192 and will rise to approximately $12,800 next fall. If the UC increases tuition by the maximum five percent each year, students in 2019 will pay about $15,560 — $3,369 more than they pay today — which would be a 28 percent increase from the current tuition.   ...

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Tuition Blame Game

In light of protests that took place on the UC Davis campus on Tuesday and a recent vote by a committee of the UC Regents to raise tuition for the 2015-16 school year, we feel that relations between UC administration, the California government and students need to be significantly improved. Many people blame UC administration and regents for supporting a tuition hike, and the administration then blames the California state government for not providing enough funding to the system. While the cyclical dialogue continues, the burden ultimately falls on the students, who have to pay excessive amounts of money for their education. Students should continue to peacefully protest and voice their opinions so that the effects of fee increases like these are clear. They should also try to foster open forums and communication with the UC administration. It is important that students demand proper advocacy on the regent and state government levels, and this will only be done through continued conversation and action about this issue. We await the final... ...

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Inside the game with Samantha Shellem

On Saturday, senior Samantha Shellem finished up the meet against BYU with three season-best times, helping to ensure a win with a final score of 149-140.  Carrying an impressive resume in and around the swimming pool, Shellem is an invaluable asset to the Aggies’ women’s swim team. Samantha was interviewed by The California Aggie soon after the win against the Cougars, where she talked about her various accomplishments. How did you get started swimming? My mom swam, and then I just loved the water so they put me in lessons, and then [the swim] team and, 15 years later… [laughs]. Why did you choose to swim for UC Davis? I actually transferred here, and Pete [Motekaitis, the associate head coach] called me and he was just like, “Well, we would really love you to swim here,” so I came on a trip and I liked the girls and I liked the coaching staff, so it was just a good fit for me. You and your teammates have done really well... ...

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UC Davis Symphony Orchestra presents “Love, Death, and Pranks”

The UC Davis Symphony Orchestra (UCDSO) will be presenting its fall concert, “Love, Death, and Pranks” at the Mondavi Center’s Jackson Hall on Saturday at 7 p.m. The concert will be conducted by Christian Baldini, music director of UCDSO, and will feature a variety of works from Europe’s romantic era. The concert is set to showcase four composers from the Austro-Germanic tradition. The program will begin with an overture to Mozart’s Idomeneo, followed by Gustav Mahler’s Rückert Lieder, Richard Wagner’s Vorspiel und Liebestod from Tristan und Isolde and end with Richard Strauss’ Till Eulenspiegels lustige Streiche. Alexander Stepans, a fourth-year music and political science double major, has been playing the horn for the orchestra since his first year at UC Davis. Stepans will be performing a big horn solo in Till Eulenspiegels, a tone poem, which describes the story of Till Eulenspiegel, a figure in German folklore. Although he has performed the solo several times for auditions, this will be Stepans’ first time performing it in concert. “Till Eulenspiegels has... ...

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Tunespoon: Haters gonna pay pay pay pay pay

If the word “twerk” resonates with you in any way, whether you view it, do it, or revile it, then I congratulate you on being a citizen of this generation. That word is charged with all sorts of connotations, often of sex, shock and racism. As a pop culture phenomenon, twerking is hard to ignore, thanks in part to the self-proclaimed morally righteous who caused an uproar, effecting waves of controversy. Exploitation of controversy has been a long-used tactic, dating back to the hypnotic pelvis of Elvis, and it’s an undeniably profitable scheme. What society labels as “pop music” isn’t about the songs (remember: music is sound, not how hot a singer is). The lifeblood of pop music is relevance. I don’t mean true relevance, like anonymous bomb threats or UC tuition increases. I mean #RELEVANCE. Bold WordArt headlines on magazines. The avoid-at-all-costs cancer called YouTube comments. To the monster called Relevance, all talk is success. To stay relevant, a pop musician has to record something new; something that is... ...

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Interclinic consortium works to increase collaboration between clinics

When fifth-year environmental toxicology major Marianne So was volunteering at the UC Davis student-run Bayanihan Clinic, it was located on V Street in Sacramento, less than a mile from a similar organization, Shifa Clinic, located on the same street. Although So knew friends at Shifa Clinic, she thought it was interesting that they had never carpooled from Davis together. In the beginning of 2014, So started the Interclinic Consortium in an attempt to organize collaboration between the nine undergraduate, student-run clinics operating in Sacramento with the help of UC Davis medical students and undergraduates. “When I was with Bayanihan Clinic as both a board member and an undergraduate volunteer, I saw that there was little collaboration between all the different student-run free clinics,” said So, who currently serves as director of the consortium. It took a total of three years from the idea’s inception to its fruition. So specifically spent her time garnering support from faculty members, board members and medical students at the clinics. “At first it was difficult,... ...

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Students lead protest in response to impending tuition hikes

Update (11/19/14, 1:30 p.m.): The UC Board of Regents passed Napolitano’s tuition plan this morning, Nov. 19, 7-2.    Three years to the day of the infamous pepper spray incident involving campus police and student demonstrators, UC Davis students once again filled the Quad this afternoon to protest, this time in response to impending tuition hikes. An estimated 500-600 students, faculty and community members convened in the center of the Quad at noon, Nov. 18, to make speeches, develop signs and mobilize the crowd to march across campus in protest of University of California (UC) President Janet Napolitano’s proposed UC tuition plan, which would increase UC tuition by up to five percent annually over the next five years. The UC Board of Regents will vote tomorrow, Nov. 19, at its meeting on the UCSF Mission Bay campus, on whether or not to implement the tuition plan. UC officials hope that the plan will pressure California state legislators and Gov. Jerry Brown to increase UC funding. Protesters marched through campus, chanting “Whose... ...

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This week in men’s sports

Basketball (1-0): UC Davis vs. Holy Names (W,  57-42) Opening their season at home against Holy Names for the second straight season, the UC Davis men’s basketball team jumped out to an early lead before coasting to a 15-point victory. The Aggies were led by senior guard Corey Hawkins and senior forward Josh Ritchart who had 12 and 13 points respectively. Hawkins added six rebounds, six assists and three steals. The game also saw the long-awaited return of senior guard Tyler Les (redshirt year) and junior forward J.T. Adenrele (injury), who both played through some rust. The Aggies will play two road games before returning to the Pavilion on Nov. 26. Cross Country: NCAA West Regionals Before the race began, the Aggies were dealt a difficult hand as top runner junior Brandon Pugh collided with a fellow runner in warm-ups and could not compete. Without Pugh, UC Davis finished in 19th place as a team. Junior Amar Dholakai and sophomore Austin Goins were the first and second Aggies to cross... ...

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Meet the ASUCD Fall 2014 Senate Candidates

Alex Lee: As the founder and president of the UC Davis Filmmaking Society, second-year political science major and independent senatorial candidate Alex Lee plans to prioritize student organizations if elected. “We have 700+ registered student organizations at UC Davis, but we don’t have ASUCD infrastructure to oversee them,” Lee said. “Student government should be about student services. I saw a need and I am trying to fill it.” In addition to increasing club resources and advocacy, Lee’s platforms include implementing testing materials vending machines and adding Boba drinks to the CoHo menu. Lee’s experience includes internships with University Affairs and ASUCD Senators Felicia Ong and Gareth Smythe. Lee said his involvement with the Vietnamese Student Association and Taiwanese Chinese Student Association also helps him understand the needs of clubs on-campus. Anabiah Syed: Coming from an underrepresented community on-campus, third-year political science major and Students Matter: Activism, Retention, Teamwork (SMART) senatorial candidate Anabiah Syed said she believes running for ASUCD Senate would allow her to give students a voice. “For me,... ...

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Volunteers, artists, Davis residents support unique local museum

A little over a year ago, a man carried a 89-pound iron ball into the Hattie Weber Museum, located on C Street in Downtown Davis. The iron ball had sat atop Davis’s first water tower, previously functioning as a lightning rod. The man’s father-in-law, who was moving to a rest home, told the volunteers at the museum that every Fourth of July, the Davis Fire Chief would crawl on top of the water tower, grab the iron ball and stand on his head to the general cheers of the masses below. This iron ball is just one of many curious artifacts donated to the Hattie Weber Museum. Situated in the corner of Davis’ Central Park, the little building exhibits a wide range of objects that each hold a little piece of Davis’ history: a locked safe that not even an expert could open, a quilt made during the Civil War, a till from the 1920s that can ring up no more than $9.99 and creamers from when UC Davis first... ...

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Arts Feature: A crash course in UC Davis’s sculptures

On the UC Davis campus, public art is more than just a part of the scenery. Art unifies the campus, inspires myth among the student body and is the result of some very rich history. The majority of the campus’ sculptures are a result of an art-in-public-places campaign by the Nelson Gallery Price Amerson and the UC Davis Fine Arts Collection. “In Davis, students and community are connected to our arts, which is unique for a college campus,” said Rachel Teagle, director of the Jan Shrem and Maria Manetti Shrem Museum of Art. The pieces are the result of the many talented artists who have passed through our university over the years, and their diverse styles match Davis’s quirky atmosphere. “In selecting pieces, we consider what is appropriate to our audience. We pick pieces that reflect our history.” said Teagle. In addition to staying true to the campus’ history, the art is also selected to spark conversation and sometimes, debate. “If nobody is talking about it, it’s probably a [poor]... ...

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Associated Student Dining Services increase prices

Starting Sept. 22, much of the food and beverages sold at Associated Student (AS) Dining Services increased in price for the first time in four years. AS Dining Services, made up of the ASUCD Coffee House, CoHo South Café and CoHo-To-Go Convenience Store, last increased prices in 2010. While certain foods, including yogurt and whole fruits, have remained at the same price, other items have become more expensive. This change is largely due to the increase of California’s minimum wage, which has gone from $8 to $9 per hour. Prices generally increased about 30 to 50 cents per item. “We’ve been looking at this, probably for the past year, as something on the horizon we would need to address,” said Darin Schluep, food service director of AS Dining Services. “When we first heard of the plan to increase California’s minimum wage, we knew we would have to react to that.” Schluep says that increasing food prices also played a role in his decision to increase prices at AS Dining Services.... ...

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University Dining Services regulates meal plan sharing

This year, UC Davis Dining Services and Student Housing will implement new dining commons policies regarding guest meals and take-out food, amongst other changes to the three dining areas on campus, for all students with meal plans. In response to these changes, a discussion was launched on the Facebook group titled “Sell/Buy DC Swipes” at the end of the 2013-2014 school year. The biggest change to dining commons policies this year, fueling the online forum, is a new limit on “guest” swipes available to students who purchase a meal plan. “We will be limiting the number of guest swipes, a swipe that allows a student to bring in an outside guest, to 10,” said Office of Student Development Director Branden Pettit in an email interview. Many students with meal plans that have been known to swipe others in are involved with larger on-campus organizations. Pettit explained that the limit was placed to protect these students from being pressured by their peers from clubs, sports teams and other extracurricular activities to... ...

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